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Mission Statement

The faculty of the Department of Communication share Youngstown State University’s mission to maintain high standards in teaching, research, and service.  To this end, faculty members are productive scholars in the discipline, staying abreast of technological and theoretical developments. These advancements are brought into the classroom to foster students’ ability to communicate competently using traditional and mediated channels. Students are introduced to the most recent and relevant communication theory, research, and technological skills through practical activities in mediated, interpersonal, public, and professional contexts that serve students’ long-term goals, promote the university, and serve the larger Youngstown community.

Department Overview

The Department of Communication houses three Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree programs and one Master of Arts (M.A.) degree program. The B.A. programs include Communication Studies, Journalism, and Telecommunication Studies. The M.A. in Professional Communication is a multidisciplinary graduate program with courses in communication, marketing, and professional and technical writing.

In addition to completing general education and major courses within specific programs, students are required to complete a minor. B.A. degrees can be earned in four years (eight semesters) if a student averages 15 to 16 hours per semester, and in three years (six semesters) if a student averages 18 to 21 hours per semester. The M.A. degree can be earned in three or four semesters.

Department of Communication students find many outlets to build on the skills they learn in and out of the classroom. For example, Lambda Pi Eta, a communication honorary organization, recognizes our outstanding students and provides opportunities for greater involvement and leadership. Opportunities for active involvement in media production and programming exist with YSU Athletics (NCAA D1 sports productions), Penguin Rundown (weekly sports web show), The Jambar (YSU's student newspaper), Light the Wick (arts-based web show), and Rookery Radio (YSU’s first-ever, internet-only, student-run radio station).

Our full- and part-time faculty are more than teachers and professors. They are mentors and motivators. Many come with experience from various communication- and media-related industries (e.g., Cleveland Plain Dealer, ESPN, WHOT 101 FM, WFMJ, WKBN, WYTV, NewsRadio 570AM, The Vindicator, etc.). They are active scholars engaged in their disciplines. Most of our faculty have interest in the study of mass media and new media, but other research interests include argumentation and rhetoric, group and organizational communication, interpersonal and intercultural communication.

The department's home office is located in Bliss Hall within the College of Creative Arts & Communication. Here, you will find a medium-sized department (a little more than 350 students) with a warm and cheerful environment that puts students first. Our facilities include smart classrooms, audio and video labs, journalism labs, and an full-HD television studio.

For more information about the department, including meeting with a faculty member who will help you prepare for the future, contact the department office at (330) 941-3631, or email our department administrative assistant, Ms. Debbie Yiannaki, at dayiannaki@ysu.edu. The department office is located in Bliss Hall, Room 2000.

Programs

Communication Studies, B.A.

Courses in this B.A. degree program provide students with the necessary communication skills for an evolving global marketplace and future career demands. The Communication Studies program deals, in part, with people in conversations in settings that are usually face-to-face, but that are increasingly becoming mediated (such as computer-mediated). Public speaking, media and public relations, persuasion, conflict management, social media, and gender communication are some of the areas students examine in this major. Courses touch on a wide variety of areas including social and political movements, the process of legislation, or new media communication.

Program Tracks

Communication Studies courses address the universal emphasis placed on effective, competent communication skills by employers and recruiters. The core curriculum of 18 credit hours includes courses covering these communication skills. The curriculum is then divided into four unique tracks to better prepare students for a particular career. Each of the tracks is described below. The overriding goal of each track is to challenge each student to explore and apply the many forms of communication:

  • Human resources or management careers in profit or nonprofit organizations, or those looking for a general, all-encompassing communication degree, should consider the interpersonal/organizational track.
  • A career path in media management, media criticism, or public relations and advertising should choose the media track.
  • Careers in pharmaceutical sales, industrial sales, retail and corporate sales, politics, or law (including law school) should choose the persuasion track.
  • Our newest curricular offering focuses on social media management, marketing, literacy, communication, and campaigning. Students interested in these new media options should choose the social media track.

Students completing their degree in communication studies are uniquely qualified to enter the job market and compete effectively throughout their careers for advancement and promotion.

Through course offerings and applied learning experiences, the communication studies program combines a rich liberal arts emphasis with a much needed specialized professional and career focus for undergraduate students.

Admission Policy for Communication Studies

To major in communication studies, entering freshmen may simply declare a communication studies major. Transfer students must have a GPA of 2.00 and be in "good academic standing." Students are expected to meet with a communication studies faculty advisor prior to registration and are encouraged to meet with an advisor when they have questions or concerns, and to monitor progress.

Journalism, B.A.

Information is power. Society must have professionals who can supply people with the information they need to make decisions about their lives and their futures. At Youngstown State University, we believe in the importance of journalism to society and to democracy. We believe that journalists have the power to shape the world.

Guided by this philosophy, YSU's journalism major gives you a balance of practical and theoretical experience. We teach you to ask tough questions, to uncover and interpret information, to write leads, to conduct interviews, and to work with technologies to deliver the news in multiple platforms from print to broadcast to podcast. We also encourage you to think critically about the stories you report and the impact they will have on communities and society in general.

The journalism program trains students for entry-level positions in reporting, editing, and newspaper design. The curriculum is a blend of courses that support this goal, such as news reporting, editorial and opinion writing, feature writing, editing and design for newspapers, a journalism practicum (journalism workshop) in which students write for the student newspaper, and a battery of courses designed to enhance editing, writing and publishing skills. Journalism majors are encouraged to declare minors that support their specific career objectives, such as public relations, photography, political science, telecommunications, or art/design.

Student Holding a Camera Outside There has never been a better time to study journalism.

With the explosion of available information, people now need and want credible information. They need what journalists do and there are more venues now than at any other point in history for how to disseminate that information.

Be prepared. This is not the journalism of yesterday. While still loyal to the basic principles of giving people accurate and reliable information that they need to make decisions about their lives, journalism has changed in how news is delivered.

Ink and newsprint are virtually obsolete. Instead, you will be telling stories with video cameras and still cameras and you will be getting story tips from readers and linking to other people's reporting. The world of modern journalism is all about innovation and entrepreneurial spirit.

Why Journalism at YSU

At Youngstown State University, we understand the importance of journalism in society.

With a hands-on teaching philosophy and a strong belief in practical experience, YSU journalism instructors train students for careers in journalism. We also train students to be entrepreneurial in their thinking about how to apply their journalistic skills. From the basics of news judgment to more sophisticated ethical decisions, YSU journalism majors graduate with the skills to land jobs, build careers and most importantly, report important stories in all media platforms.

We keep close watch on trends in the industry and are always eager for ways to integrate new ideas and technologies into what we teach. We are also deeply committed to innovation and experimentation. We work hard to help our students gain professional experience and routinely help them get their work broadcast or published by local, state and national media.

Reporters and editors from numerous legacy and new media organizations, from The Vindicator and The New York Times to ProPublica and WFMJ Television, offer us regular feedback about our program and what we need to be offering students.

Admission Policy for journalism

To major in journalism, entering freshmen may simply declare a journalism major. Transfer students must have a GPA of 2.00 and be in "good academic standing." Students are expected to meet with a journalism faculty advisor prior to registration and are encouraged to meet with an advisor when they have questions or concerns, and to monitor progress.

Telecommunication Studies, B.A.

Telecommunication Studies (TCOM) at YSU is a dynamic, cutting edge baccalaureate program comprising about 125 majors and 12 full- and part-time faculty. We focus on the messages that bombard us every day — through advertising, television and film, news, the Internet, magazines, friends, family and more. We study how to make those messages, how to package and distribute them, and how to profit from them.

Our program addresses human communication that passes through some medium such as television, radio or the Internet. For example, in this area, students may study how the Internet impacts traditional forms of broadcast media (i.e., radio, television). Students learn about early stages of the field, as well as contemporary combinations of telecasting through the Internet. Courses in the TCOM curriculum provide students with an in-depth knowledge and intellectual challenge in electronic communication. Students receive practical orientation to the skills and techniques of broadcasting. Students explore contemporary theories and problems which are central to media, as well as examine new communication media.

From a liberal arts perspective, the TCOM curriculum is designed to aid the student in pursuit of careers not only in broadcasting but also in recently expanding avenues of communication such as non-commercial broadcasting, corporate communication, industrial communication, cablecasting, and independent production. Internships are available in media organizations to students of superior academic achievement.

Program Tracks

Your degree program will comprise several clusters of requirements:

General Education, which helps you learn the core knowledge for a college education and to master the skills you’ll need to be effective in learning at advanced levels.

Major and Minor, where you develop mastery of your main interest areas. Also, you study at levels far above that in any other course area.

You’ll find two types of courses in your major. Some are regular classroom courses where you develop your intellectual knowledge and skill. Others are applied or studio courses that help you master your media performance, production or business skills.

Tracks are clusters of required and elective courses within your major to develop a specific focus of study or a particular set of media skills. There are two tracks in the B.A. degree program in telecommunication studies:

  • Media Arts Track
  • Sports Broadcasting Track

Electives, which are courses you elect to take because of their particular importance to your intellectual growth.

Admission Policy for teleCommunication Studies

Students who declare an intent to major in telecommunication studies, whether on the media arts track or sports broadcasting track, will be assigned to the "Pre-Telecommunication" (Pre-TCOM) category. Upon completion of 15 semester hours while in the Pre-TCOM category, and completion of ENGL 1550, TCOM 1570 OR 1580, and TCOM 1581 (with grades of A or B in all three), students will be reassigned to the "Telecommunication Studies" (TCOM) category and track of choice (media arts OR sports broadcasting).

Students may transfer to the Pre-TCOM, but not TCOM, category from another program at YSU or from another institution. Students who have completed associate- or bachelor-level degrees also may enter the Pre-TCOM, but not TCOM, category. Upon completion of 15 semester hours while in the Pre-TCOM category, and completion of ENGL 1550, TCOM 1570 OR 1580, and TCOM 1581 (with grades of "A" or "B" in all three), students will be reassigned to the TCOM category.

Students who have interrupted their attendance at YSU for three consecutive semesters or more will be assigned to the Pre-TCOM category upon return (even if the student was a TCOM major). After completion of 15 semester hours while in the Pre-TCOM category, and completion of ENGL 1550, TCOM 1570 OR 1580, and TCOM 1581 (with grades of "A" or "B" in all three), students will be reassigned to the TCOM category.

Chair

Amy Graban Crawford, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Acting Chair

Adam C. Earnheardt, Ph.D., Professor, Chair


Professor

Shelley Blundell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Rebecca M. L. Curnalia, Ph.D., Associate Professor

Mary Beth Earnheardt, Ph.D., Associate Professor

Max V. Grubb, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Walter T. Mathews, Ph.D., Associate Professor

Daniel J. O'Neill, Ph.D., Professor

Alfred W. Owens, Ph.D., Professor

Jeffrey L. Tyus, Ph.D., Associate Professor

Cary Wecht, Ph.D., Professor


Instructor

David Davis, M.S., Instructor

Patricia Foltz, M.A., Instructor

Guy Harrison, M.S., Instructor

Jaietta Jackson, M.A., Instructor

Dorian Mermer, M.A., Instructor

CMST 1545    Communication Foundations    3 s.h.

Theories, strategies, and skills for competent participation in interpersonal, group, and public communication situations. Application exercises in interpersonal, group, and public communication.
Prereq.: Qualified to take ENGL 1550.

CMST 1545H    Honors Communication Foundations    3 s.h.

Theories, strategies, and skills for competent participation in interpersonal, group, and public communication situations. Application exercises in interpersonal, group, and public communication.
Prereq.: Qualified to take ENGL 1550.

CMST 2600    Communication Theory    3 s.h.

The study of significant theories of communication that reflect the diversity of communication studies and address different communication contexts: interpersonal, group, public, organizational, and mass.
Gen Ed: Social Science.

CMST 2610    Intercultural Communication    3 s.h.

The study of key historical and contemporary theories that affect communication across cultural boundaries. Exercises for improving communication skills in intercultural communication situations are included.
Gen Ed: Domestic Diversity, Social and Personal Awareness.

CMST 2630    Social Media Literacy    3 s.h.

Analyze and evaluate social media communication in its variety of forms. Includes message evaluation, digital media curating, ethics and privacy.

CMST 2645    Presentational Speaking    3 s.h.

In-depth examination of the theory and practice of preparing and delivering presentations in today's work environment. Emphasis on using technology aids during presentations.
Prereq.: CMST 1545 or equivalent.

CMST 2650    Rhetoric of Film    3 s.h.

Conceptual examination and critical analyses of film including mythic, feminism, Marxist, auteur, genre, and rhetorical perspectives.
Prereq.: ENGL 1551.

CMST 2655    Communication in Groups and Organizations    3 s.h.

Introduction to theories and concepts relating to group and organizational communication effectiveness with practical career applications.

CMST 2656    Interpersonal Communication    3 s.h.

An examination of the skills necessary to develop, maintain, and evaluate one-to-one relationships. Through practical experiences from everyday life, the class examines what occurs when one person communicates with another.

CMST 3700    Designing Communication Research    3 s.h.

A study of the processes involved in designing both qualitative and quantitative communication research projects. Communication research design and implementation.
Prereq.: 15 s.h. of Communication Studies including CMST 2600, and ENGL 1551.

CMST 3717    Intro to Media Relations Campaigns    3 s.h.

An experiential, service-learning course in designing and implementing Media Relations campaigns.
Prereq.: CMST 1545.

CMST 3740    Social Media Communication    3 s.h.

Examination of applications and strategies for communicating through social media, including managing personal and professional social media messages, social media content development, and dissemination.
Prereq.: CMST 2630.

CMST 3745    Individual Studies    1-3 s.h.

Student selects a special problem or issue in communication to research in detail under the direction of a faculty member, pending department committee approval. Repeatable to 6 hrs.
Prereq.: Junior standing.

CMST 3750    Gender Communication    3 s.h.

Principal concepts and issues of gender and communication as they apply to identity, and communication within and between the genders in a variety of contexts.
Prereq.: CMST 1545.

CMST 3754    Argumentation    3 s.h.

Developing critical thinking through systematic evaluation of theories, principles, and practices of argumentation.
Prereq.: CMST 2600.

CMST 3756    Interviewing    3 s.h.

Theories of communication applied to interview situations with a special concern for developing student understanding of and skills needed to participate in one-to-one and panel interviews.
Prereq.: CMST 1545 and junior standing.

CMST 3757    Media Relations Writing    3 s.h.

A lecture-lab course in writing pamphlets, advertisements, newsletters, and websites for media relations campaigns.
Prereq.: ENGL 1551.

CMST 4850    Social Media Campaigns    3 s.h.

Integrated media campaign development using social media applications; theory and practice of social media campaign lifecycles including inception, implementation, and evaluation of client-based projects.
Prereq.: CMST 1545 and junior standing.

CMST 4851    New Communication Media    3 s.h.

New media histories, technologies, and cultures. Considers promising future forms, and includes issues of authorship, community, identity, interactivity, visuality, the nature and power of technology, intelligent systems, and artificial life.
Prereq.: CMST 2600 and junior standing.

CMST 4855    Interpersonal Communication Relationships    3 s.h.

Theories of relationship development, maintenance and termination. The impact of face-to-face and mediated communication on interpersonal relationships.
Prereq.: CMST 2600 and CMST 2656 and junior standing.

CMST 4859    Organizational Cultures    3 s.h.

Analysis of organizational cultures. Relationships between organizational culture and communication in modern organizations.
Prereq.: CMST 2655 or junior standing.

CMST 4896    Internship    3 s.h.

An application of communication theories and practice within organizational settings. Weekly meetings with faculty supervisor are required. Weekly field work is 15 hours. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 s.h.
Prereq.: CMST 2655, junior standing, major in Communication Studies, and approval of Internship Proposal form.

CMST 4898    Media Analysis    3 s.h.

Application of methods of analysis to describe and critique the content of various types of media, including new media, news media, and entertainment media. Emphasis on the relationship between media content, uses, and effects.
Prereq.: CMST 3700.

CMST 4899    Senior Project    3 s.h.

Synthesis of research, writing, and presentation skills through the completion of a communication research project and professional development activity. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 s.h. Grading is Traditional/PR.
Prereq.: Senior standing, major in Communication Studies, 24 s.h. of communication studies major complete, including CMST 3700 or 3799.
Gen Ed: Capstone.

CMST 5852    Conflict Management and Negotiation    3 s.h.

An in-depth analysis of the theories and variables influencing conflict management, resolution, and negotiation. Includes strategies and skills for meditation and arbitration.
Prereq.: CMST 2600.

CMST 5860    Persuasion and New Media    3 s.h.

Introduction to persuasion theory and application of theory to new communication media.
Prereq.: CMST 2600 and CMST 3700 or graduate status.

CMST 5898    Seminar    3 s.h.

A cooperative exploration of topics in communication studies. May be repeated up to 6 s.h.
Prereq.: CMST 2600.

CMST 6900    Introduction to Graduate Study    1 s.h.

Orientation to teaching, learning, and research in the communication discipline for new graduate students.

CMST 6945    Communication for the Classroom Teacher    3 s.h.

The study of communication theory and practice appropriate for the prospective classroom teacher. Theories and application exercises focus on interpersonal communication, group communication, and classroom speaking.

CMST 6950    Computer Mediated Communication Research    3 s.h.

Theory, research, and application of CMC including examination of computer communication theories and relevant research methodologies, web design theory and critiques, blogging, podcasting, e-mailing, social media, multimedia storytelling. Design, implementation, and evaluation of CMC.

CMST 6953    Group Dynamics: Theory and Research    3 s.h.

Theory and research of group processes, critical thinking and creativity strategies, theory of group leadership and teamwork, conflict management and mediation, advanced group decision-making and problem solving, motivational strategies.

CMST 6957    Organizational Communication Research    3 s.h.

Applies theories of organizational communication to a chosen organization. Culminates with report and presentation.

CMST 6970    Internship    3 s.h.

Communication-related work in a non-academic professional setting.
Prereq.: Completion of the MA core courses.

CMST 6980    Applied Research Methods    3 s.h.

Introduction to and application of qualitative research methods relevant to business communication settings.

CMST 6990    Measurement and Analysis    3 s.h.

Research processes using social scientific, quantitative methodologies and practical experience in conducting research. Essential skill development in research design, measurement, data collection and data analysis.

CMST 6991    Communication Problems: Independent Study    3 s.h.

Individual study and practical application of communication research principles to various organizational, group and mediated communication problems.

CMST 6994    Capstone    3 s.h.

Applied research paper on a communication topic. Oral presentation required. For non-thesis option students only. Thesis option students should take CMST 6995: Thesis.
Prereq.: Completion of the MA core courses.

CMST 6995    Thesis    1-6 s.h.

Research study on an applied communication topic. Oral presentation required. Total of 6 s.h. required for the MA thesis option. For thesis option students only. Non-thesis option students should take CMST 6994: Capstone.
Prereq.: Completion of the MA core courses.

JOUR 2600    Investigative Reporting Workshop    1 s.h.

Students become part of a team of reporters. The program will identify one reporting project that will be the focus of this laboratory. The project will be reported until completion. Students are expected to participate in gathering and analyzing information and in the writing and/or production of stories. Repeatable for up to 3 s.h.

JOUR 2602    Media Writing    3 s.h.

Introduction to writing for the mass media. Development of writing techniques and examination of styles and approaches used in writing for various mass audiences. Fulfills requirement for Integrated Language Arts Middle Childhood teaching license.
Prereq.: Completion of ENGL 1551 with grade "C" or better.

JOUR 2603    Journalism Ethics and Social Responsibilities    3 s.h.

Examination of ethical standards and moral theories and their practical application in professional journalism through case studies. Students will learn to become active critics of media professionals.
Gen Ed: Arts and Humanities.

JOUR 2605    Journalism as Literature    3 s.h.

Examination of literary works by journalists. Study of journalism techniques transferred to literary storytelling.
Gen Ed: Arts and Humanities.

JOUR 2622    News Reporting 1    3 s.h.

Study of news reporting and writing, with emphasis on journalistic and AP style, development of news judgment, interviewing, and storytelling through traditional and new media. Coursework may require travel for reporting projects.
Prereq.: Completion of ENGL 1551 with grade "C" or better.

JOUR 2624    Imaging and Design of Media    3 s.h.

Focus on the use of photographs, graphics, tables, charts, and other visual products to convey messages. Includes study of basic visual literacy, design principles and technology. Crosslisted as ENGL 2624.

JOUR 2626    American Journalism    3 s.h.

The development of journalism in America, the role of the news media and its effects on American society, and special consideration of journalism as a tool of diversity and as a literary tradition.
Prereq.: Completion of ENGL 1550 with a "C" or better.

JOUR 2632    Introduction to Photojournalism    3 s.h.

The basics of photojournalism, including composition, lighting, editing, news judgment, and ethics.

JOUR 3716    Introduction to Magazine Journalism    3 s.h.

Focus on forces driving the magazine industry. Study of business models, freelancing, and writing for specialized audiences; includes basic feature writing and imaging techniques.
Prereq.: JOUR 2622 and JOUR 2624.

JOUR 3717    Editorial and Opinion Writing    3 s.h.

Techniques, approaches and practice in writing reviews, editorials, and opinion columns. Exercises in criticisms of the arts, editorial research, and editorial style.
Prereq.: JOUR 2622.

JOUR 3720L    Magazine Journalism Workshop    1 s.h.

Working for campus publications to apply news gathering and reporting skills. Emphasis on organizational culture of magazines. Coursework may require travel for reporting projects. May be repeated for up to 3 s.h.
Prereq.: JOUR 3716 or consent of instructor.

JOUR 3721L    Journalism Workshop    3 s.h.

Application of the principles of news reporting skills in student media. May be repeated once.
Prereq.: JOUR 2622.

JOUR 3722L    Radio News Workshop    3 s.h.

Production of news and feature stories to be aired on radio; development of interview and media production skills for news. Coursework may require travel for reporting projects.
Prereq.: JOUR 2622.

JOUR 3723    Advanced Journalism Editing and Design    3 s.h.

Application of visual literacy and editing skills. Emphasis on editorial decision making, journalistic style editing, quantitative reasoning, fact-checking, and practice of traditional and multimedia design techniques.
Prereq.: JOUR 2622 and JOUR 2624.

JOUR 3725    News Reporting 1    3 s.h.

Study of news reporting and writing, with emphasis on journalistic and AP style, development of news judgment, interviewing, and storytelling through traditional and new media. Coursework may require travel for reporting projects.
Prereq.: Completion of JOUR 2624 OR ENGL 1551 with grade "C" or better.

JOUR 3726    American Journalism    3 s.h.

The development of journalism in America, the role of the news media and its effects on American society, and special consideration of journalism as a tool of diversity and as a literary tradition.
Prereq.: Completion of ENGL 1550 or JOUR 2624 with a C or better.

JOUR 3758    Projects in Working Class Reporting    3 s.h.

Collaboration with the Center for Working Class Studies. Emphasis on using journalistic techniques to cover issues important to working-class people. Coursework may require travel for projects.
Prereq.: ENGL 1551.

JOUR 3759    Sports Journalism    3 s.h.

Techniques of sports reporting with emphasis on game reporting, sports features, columns, photography and new media storytelling. Coursework may require travel for reporting projects.
Prereq.: JOUR 2622 or consent of instructor.

JOUR 3760    News Reporting 2    3 s.h.

Focus is on advanced news reporting and storytelling skills. Includes in-depth coverage of feature writing, investigative, and enterprise journalism. Coursework may require travel for reporting projects.
Prereq.: JOUR 2622.

JOUR 3761    New Media Journalism    3 s.h.

Focus on new trends and techniques of electronic news organizations. Emphasis on storytelling using multimedia and non-linear methods of delivery. Coursework may require travel for reporting projects.
Prereq.: JOUR 2622 and JOUR 2624.

JOUR 3762    Political Reporting    3 s.h.

Development of skills necessary to report, write, record, and publish stories about the American political system. Coursework may require travel for reporting projects.
Prereq.: JOUR 2622.

JOUR 4821    Advising Student Media    3 s.h.

Study of the role and responsibilities of the media advisor in high school and college. Topics include the unique legal and ethical concerns of student media, the training of student staff, the relationship of the student press to the academic administration, and publication-management concerns. Listed also as ENGL 4821.
Prereq.: JOUR 2622 or ENGL 3741.

JOUR 4822    Magazine Writing and Reporting    3 s.h.

Advanced study of writing and reporting techniques for magazine journalists. Emphasis on learning freelance skills, getting work published, and marketing yourself as a magazine writer. Coursework may require travel for reporting projects.
Prereq.: JOUR 3716.

JOUR 4823    In-Depth Reporting    3 s.h.

Emphasis on extended research, extensive interviewing and investigative reporting techniques. Coursework may require travel for reporting projects.
Prereq.: JOUR 3721L.

JOUR 4824    Press Law and Ethics    3 s.h.

Study of First Amendment rights of the press; examination of laws concerning libel, privacy, copyright, obscenity, censorship, open meetings and open records in Ohio; discussion of press responsibilities.
Prereq.: JOUR, 2622 or JOUR 3721L.

JOUR 4825    Selected Topics in Journalism    3 s.h.

Study of approaches to and special aspects of journalism not covered in depth in other journalism courses. May be repeated once with change of topic.
Prereq.: JOUR 2622 or JOUR 3721L.

JOUR 4893    Journalism Senior Project    3 s.h.

Capstone experience for journalism major. Individualized enterprise/investigative reporting projects with demonstration of advanced newsgathering techniques. Coursework may require travel for reporting projects.
Prereq.: Senior standing; and JOUR 3760 and JOUR 4824.
Gen Ed: Capstone.

JOUR 4894    Journalism Internship    3 s.h.

Supervised journalism work experience. Students complete 60 hours for each hour registered. Internship placement is selective. Coursework may require travel for reporting projects. May be repeated with the approval of the department chairperson for up to 6 hours.
Prereq.: JOUR 3760 and JOUR 3721L; senior standing, 2.5 GPA and permit.

TCOM 1500    Orientation to Telecommunication Studies    1 s.h.

Survey of University and Department programs, policies, practices and facilities with particular emphasis on needs of telecommunication studies majors. Creation of telecommunication studies portfolio materials and other aspects of the Telecommunication Studies program. To be taken prior to TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683.

TCOM 1510    Sports Field Production 1    1 s.h.

Assignment to one or more production crews in conjunction with YSU Athletics and Horizon League Sports. Student responsibilities will be determined in light of skills and interests, as well as the production need. May be repeated.

TCOM 1555L    Radio Workshop    3 s.h.

Application of the principles of radio production and broadcasting skills in student media.

TCOM 1570    Elements of Sports Production and Law    3 s.h.

A study of electronic media as business and social forces; also an overview of studio/OB production. Attention given to how media and sport industries grew as consorts into Sports Broadcasting. Basic legal considerations for sports broadcasters. The equivalent of 2 hours lecture and 2 hours field-based lab per week.

TCOM 1580    Introduction to Telecommunication Studies    3 s.h.

A survey course designed to familiarize students with the principles and practices involved in radio and television broadcasting, cable, and other electronic communication systems.

TCOM 1581    Telecommunication Technologies    2 s.h.

Operational principles of audio, data, and video telecommunication technologies. One hour lecture and two hours lab per week.

TCOM 1595    Survey of American Mass Communications    3 s.h.

A rhetorical examination of the development, operation, and function of radio, television, film, and print media in America. Television documentaries and films illustrate the implication of mass communication. Students examine how a person may be individually affected by mass communication.
Gen Ed: Social Science.

TCOM 2610    Sports Field Production 2    1 s.h.

Assignment to one or more production crews in conjunction with YSU Athletics and Horizon League Sports. Student responsibilities will be determined in light of skills and interests, as well as the production need. May be repeated.
Prereq.: TCOM 1510.

TCOM 2682    Scriptwriting for Electronic Media    3 s.h.

Fundamentals of telecommunication media writing with emphasis on the theory analysis and practices in the preparation of continuity, news, and documentaries.
Prereq.: TCOM 1570 or TCOM 1580; TCOM 1581; and ENGL 1550 with a grade of "C" or better in all.

TCOM 2683    Media Operations and Performance    3 s.h.

An introduction of practices and procedures basic to media production facilities. The equivalent of three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
Prereq.: TCOM 1580 or TCOM 1570 and ENGL 1550 with a grade of "C" or better in both.

TCOM 2684    Broadcast News Practices    3 s.h.

Organization, preparation, and presentation of radio and television news programs. Includes study of journalistic requirements of broadcast media and broadcast newsroom operation. The equivalent of three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both.

TCOM 2685    Studio Operations 1    1 s.h.

A supervised application of operations and performance skills to audio and/or video programming. Repeatable to a maximum of 2 s.h.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both.

TCOM 3710    Sports Field Production 3    1 s.h.

Assignment to one or more production crews in conjunction with YSU Athletics and Horizon League Sports. Student responsibilities will be determined in light of skills and interests, as well as the production need. May be repeated.
Prereq.: TCOM 2610.

TCOM 3780    Principles and Practices of Media Announcing    3 s.h.

A study of the announcer's role in electronic mass media. Examination of theories, techniques, and major styles of media announcing. Three hours lecture, two or more hours of individualized lab per week.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both; major in Telecommunication Studies.

TCOM 3781    Audio Production    3 s.h.

Study of the concepts of audio production, including student production of various types of programs. The equivalent of three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both; major in Telecommunication Studies.

TCOM 3782    Video Production 1    3 s.h.

Study of studio production elements such as equipment, lighting, scene design, graphics, and special effects. The equivalent of three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both; major in Telecommunication Studies.

TCOM 3783    Telecommunications Regulation    3 s.h.

Responsibilities of electronic media communicators as prescribed by law and administrative agency policies, and court decisions. Analysis of the regulatory environment of broadcasters, common carriers, and cable.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both; major or minor in Telecommunication Studies.

TCOM 3784    Telecommunication Programming    3 s.h.

A study of contemporary broadcast and cable programming, including development, scheduling, and competitive strategies.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both; major or minor in Telecommunication Studies.

TCOM 3785    Studio Operations 2    1 s.h.

Individual projects or assignments in planning, coordinating and assessing production and programming related to studio procedures.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both; acceptance of project Proposal Form by coordinating faculty member and department chairperson.

TCOM 3786    Video Production 2    3 s.h.

Study and application of television production elements and editing. Production values of composition, transition, and sequence explored from a communication perspective. Students produce field-based productions. Three hours lecture, two hours lab.
Prereq.: TCOM 3782.

TCOM 3787    Practicum in Telecommunication    1-3 s.h.

Individual study and practical application of communication principles to various telecommunication problems. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 s.h.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both.

TCOM 3788    Professional Residency    2 s.h.

Professional telecommunication-related experience under direction of University faculty members and employees of firms participating in the residency program. The student is responsible for securing the professional residency with assistance of Telecommunication Studies program faculty.
Prereq.: TCOM major, junior standing.

TCOM 3789    Electronic Media Interviewing    3 s.h.

A study and application of interviewing and reporting techniques, emphasizing the local news interview and public affairs reporting. The equivalent of three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both.

TCOM 3790    Broadcast News Lab    3 s.h.

Study and lab in news programs for TV, radio and web. Requirements of broadcast media and newsroom operation. Students create the weekly webcast, Light the Wick, or similar content. Two hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
Prereq.: JOUR 2622 or TCOM 2682 or TCOM 2683.

TCOM 3791    Electronic Media Sales and Promotion    3 s.h.

An examination of the principles and practices of selling electronic media. Analysis of rating-based sales and promotion strategies, as well as relations with agencies and station representatives. The equivalent of three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both.

TCOM 3792    Broadcast Sports Producing and Writing    3 s.h.

A study of the fundamentals of producing broadcast sports media content, including script development and line producing.
Prereq.: TCOM 1570, TCOM 2682, TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better.

TCOM 3793    Broadcast Sports Performance    3 s.h.

Students receive instruction on play-by-play announcing and on the preparation and extemporaneous discussion of player and team statistics as well as other appropriate sports-related information. Skills for conducting media interviews.
Prereq.: TCOM 1570, TCOM 2682, TCOM 2683.

TCOM 3794    Cross-platform Sports Broadcasting    3 s.h.

Examination of and instruction in new media technologies to deliver sports media content. Emphasis on how the interactive nature of online content changes traditional notions of presentation and distribution.
Prereq.: TCOM 1570, TCOM 2682, TCOM 2683.

TCOM 3795    Sports Media Production 1    3 s.h.

Theory and practice of remote radio and television sports production for volleyball, soccer, and baseball. Students produce and direct coverage of sporting events. Meets equivalent of 2 hours lecture plus 4 hours field lab per week. May be repeated once.
Prereq.: TCOM 1570, TCOM 2682, TCOM 2683.

TCOM 4850    Advanced Audio/Video Production and Editing    3 s.h.

Advanced techniques and procedures in audio/video production. Techniques include digital editing and video post-production procedures. Recognize current video and audio technology and how to troubleshoot problems associated with such technology.
Prereq.: TCOM 3781 or TCOM 3782 with a grade of "C" or better.

TCOM 4881    Telecommunication Management    3 s.h.

A study of the relationships of communication management with government, networks, ownership and other groups. Organization and procedures of typical units; common planning models.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both; major or minor in Telecommunication Studies.

TCOM 4882    Studio Operations Management 3    2 s.h.

Advanced individual projects or assignments in planning, coordinating and assessing production and programming related to studio procedures. Repeatable for a maximum of 4 s.h..
Prereq.: TCOM 3785; acceptance of Project Proposal Form by coordinating faculty member and department chairperson.

TCOM 4884    Video Production Direction    3 s.h.

A study and application of the communication roles and skills associated with video directing. Emphasis on audience analysis. The equivalent of three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
Prereq.: TCOM 3782.

TCOM 4885    Developments in Telecommunication Media    3 s.h.

Study and application of uses of telecommunication media apart from commercial broadcasting. Study of new technologies and their potential.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both.

TCOM 4886    Audience and Market Measure    3 s.h.

Methods of collecting, analyzing, and using information about media markets. Includes quantitative and non-quantitative techniques.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both.

TCOM 4887    Theories and Criticisms of Telecommunication    3 s.h.

Study of contemporary theories and research in telecommunication.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both; major or minor in Telecommunication Studies.

TCOM 4888    Internship Telecommunication    3 s.h.

An application of telecommunication theory and practices within organizations primarily concerned with telecommunication. Students are selected on the basis of special qualifications, including GPA, courses taken, and competitive interview. Enrollment is contingent on the availability of internship positions. Twenty hours a week.
Prereq.: Junior standing in telecommunications and permission of internship coordinator.

TCOM 4889    Broadcast Sports Internship    3 s.h.

An application of sports media theory and practices within sports and sports media organizations such as university, semi-professional and professional organizations.
Prereq.: TCOM 1570, TCOM 3792, TCOM 3793, TCOM 3794, and TCOM 3795; selection by sponsoring organization.

TCOM 4890    Producing Broadcast News    3 s.h.

Supervision of news programs for TV, radio and web. Story development, shooting/editing, script management, graphics creation, studio operations, and on-camera performance. Creation and marketing of the webcast, Light the Wick, or equivalent. Two hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
Prereq.: TCOM 3790.

TCOM 4897    Seminar in Telecommunication    3 s.h.

Designed to investigate contemporary aspects of telecommunications. May be repeated for credit if topic is different.
Prereq.: TCOM 2682 and TCOM 2683 with a grade of "C" or better in both; major in Telecommunication Studies.

TCOM 4899    Capstone    2 s.h.

Students demonstrate mastery of knowledge in a variety of degree assessment areas. Students prepare and present a portfolio of their work. The course assists students in assembling and presenting the portfolio to department faculty and other interested parties. To be taken after achieving senior status as a Telecommunications Studies major.
Prereq.: senior status in Telecommunication Studies.
Gen Ed: Capstone.