Program Director

Dr. Sherri R. Lovelace-Cameron
5016 Ward Beecher Science Hall
(330) 941-1997
srlovelacecameron@ysu.edu

Program Description

The Department of Chemistry offers a program of study leading to the M.S. degree with con­centrations available in:

  • analytical,
  • biochemistry,
  • inorganic,
  • materials,
  • organic, and
  • physical chemistry.

The program prepares the student for practice as a professional chemist by teaching academic fundamentals, creative and independent thinking through independent study and research, and leadership skills through interaction with undergraduate students as graduate teaching assistants. The program is also excellent preparation for further advanced study at other institutions, leading to the Ph.D. degree in chemistry or professional degrees in chemistry-related fields. The department has state-of-the-art instrumentation facilities and a wide assortment of instruments readily available for student and faculty research including: two powder- and three single-crys­tal X-ray diffractometers, a transmission electron microscope, a Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy system, two 400 MHz NMRs, FTIR, ICP-AES, AA, GC-MS, LC-MS, high resolution MS, several HPLCs, X-ray fluorescence, thermogravimetric analyzers, differential scanning calorimeter, gel permeation chromatograph, diode array spectrophotometers, and electrochemi­cal systems.

 

Advisement

Entering students are advised by the program director. Within the first semester of full-time graduate studies, the student should select a thesis advisor, who will assist the student in plan­ning the remainder of the program. Within the first year of full-time graduate studies, the student should select a thesis advisory committee in consultation with the thesis advisor. The commit­tee, including the advisor, will meet periodically with the student to evaluate the progress of the research and to provide guidance.

Admission Requirements

In addition to the minimum admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies, an applicant for admission to the M.S. degree program in the Department of Chemistry must present an undergraduate major in chemistry or the equivalent. Ordinarily, this entails the completion of at least a year’s study in both organic and physical chemistry. In those cases where the undergraduate preparation is slightly deficient, the applicant may be admitted with provi­sional status with the approval of the chair of the Chemistry Department and the Graduate Dean. Students must achieve an acceptable score on the Graduate Record Examination general test (GRE) for admission to the program. The Chemistry or Biochemistry subject GRE test is also required of all students who do not have a B.S. or B.A. in chemistry or biochemistry.

Students must submit three recommendation letters and responses, of less than one page, to the following four statements;

  1. Describe your academic background.  Indicate major and minor(s) in college study, any honors attained or special activities engaged in, and degrees, titles or certificates earned.
  2. Describe your employment experience in chronological order, including name and location of employer, kinds of positions held, and responsibilities involved.
  3. Describe any research experience or if you have an interest in a specialized field within chemistry.
  4. Describe your purpose in working for a master's degree, including your occupational plans and goals.

Graduate Faculty

Ganesaratnam K. Balendiran, Ph.D., Professor
Biomolecular structural biochemistry; structure and function of biological molecules and manipulation of their physiological properties with novel chemicals for health benefits

Larry S. Curtin, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Electroanalytical chemistry; synthetic inorganic chemistry; self-assembled monolayers; buck­minsterfullerene; conducting polymers and charge transfer salts

Douglas T. Genna, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Merging organic chemistry with metal organic frame-works; stabilization of reactice intermediates

Allen D. Hunter, Ph.D., Professor
Materials chemistry; crystallography; instrumental Methods; chemistry education

John A. Jackson, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Synthetic organic chemistry; organophosphorus chemistry; synthetic methodology; biologically active compounds; asymmetric synthesis

Brian D. Leskiw, Ph.D., Professor
Mass spectrometric investigation of various compounds, including chemical vapor deposition precursors, substituted phenols, and trace analysis of pyrazines/haloanisoles

Clovis Linkous, Ph.D., Professor
Ceramic electrolytes, polymer membrane electrolytes, solid state hydrogen storage, photovoltaic materials, photocatalytic decomposition of hydrogen sulfide; algae inhibition

Sherri R. Lovelace-Cameron, Ph.D., Professor
Synthesis and electrochemistry of novel organometallic polymers; synthesis of metal organic frameworks

Peter Norris, Ph.D., Professor
Synthesis of novel monomers, oligomers, and polymers derived from carbohydrates; environmentally friendly methods to organic synthesis; catalytic decomposition of natural azide nad diazo

Michael A. Serra, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Effects of free radicals on proteins

Josef B. Simeonsson, Ph.D., Professor
Analytical atomic and molecular spectroscopy; trace and ultratrace analysis; laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy; laser ionization spectroscopy; Raman spectroscopy; environmental analysis

Nina V. Stourman, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Studies of bacterial functional genomics during response to stress; bacterial glutahione metabolism and the mechanism and biological role of bifunctional enzyme glutahionyl spermidine synthetase/amidase (GSS) and its products in E. coli

Timothy R. Wagner, Ph.D., Professor, Chair
Synthesis of inorganic oxide and mixed-anion materials; structure characterizations using single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction; electron microscopy techniques

A minimum of 35 semester hours of credit is required for the M.S. degree.

COURSETITLES.H.
Required Courses
CHEM 6980Introduction to Chemical Research (taken the first year)3
CHEM 6981Seminar 11
CHEM 6982Seminar 21
Content Chemistry Courses
Select 15 semester hours15
Electives
Select 6 semester hours in consultation with advisor6
Thesis
CHEM 6990Thesis9-12
Total Semester Hours35-38

For graduation, the student must achieve a grade point average of 3.0 or higher in chemistry and must complete an acceptable research proposal, written thesis, and oral defense of the thesis.

Teaching Assistants

COURSETITLES.H.
Required Courses
CHEM 6980Introduction to Chemical Research (taken the first year)3
CHEM 6981Seminar 11
CHEM 6982Seminar 21
CHEM 6975An Introduction to Teaching Chemistry (taken the first year)1
Register for one of the following each semester (does not count towards the degree):
Teaching Practicum in General Chemistry
Teaching Practicum in Allied Health Chemistry
Teaching Practicum in Organic Chemistry
Teaching Practicum for Chemistry in Modern Living Lab
Content Chemistry Courses
Select 15 semester hours15
Electives
Select 6 semester hours in consultation with advisor6
Thesis
CHEM 6990Thesis9-12
Total Semester Hours36-39

For graduation, the student must achieve a grade point average of 3.0 or higher in chemistry and must complete an acceptable research proposal, written thesis, and oral defense of the thesis. 

Learning Outcomes

  1. Graduate students will demonstrate a thorough understanding of the chemical principles related to their chosen area of Chemistry or Biochemistry.
  2. Graduate students will demonstrate the ability to search and critically assess the scientific literature.
  3. Graduate students will demonstrate a thorough understanding of the applications and basic principles of the chemical instrumentation, techniques, and/or software that is commonly used in their sub-discipline.
  4. Graduate students will effectively communicate their research ideas and findings both orally and in writing.

Graduate Courses

CHEM 5804    Chemical Instrumentation    4 s.h.

The theoretical foundations of instrumental procedures and the use of instruments in analytical work. Two hours lecture, six hours lab.
Prereq.: CHEM 3739.

CHEM 5804L    Chemical Instrumentation Laboratory    0 s.h.

Chemical Instrumentation Laboratory.

CHEM 5821    Intermediate Organic Chemistry    3 s.h.

An intermediate treatment of organic chemistry building on the principles introduced at the sophomore level. Emphasis on curved arrow notation in mechanism and the planning of organic syntheses. Structural analysis of organic compounds using NMR, IR and MS and the application of structural knowledge to questions of mechanism.
Prereq.: CHEM 3720.

CHEM 5822    Advanced Organic Laboratory    4 s.h.

An advanced approach to the applications of organic chemistry in the laboratory. Synthesis and purification of organic molecules using modern techniques, structure elucidation using spectroscopic techniques. Lecture discussion includes use of instrumentation, planning of practical syntheses, use of the primary chemical literature and safety in the laboratory. Two hours lecture, six hours lab.
Prereq.: CHEM 3720.

CHEM 5822L    Advanced Organic Laboratory    0 s.h.

Advanced Organic Laboratory.

CHEM 5830    Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry    2 s.h.

Reactions and descriptive chemistry of transition metal, organometallic, and main-group compounds.
Prereq.: CHEM 3729, CHEM 3740 (may be concurrent).

CHEM 5831    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory    2 s.h.

Preparation of typical inorganic compounds and their characterization. Six hours lab-discussion.
Prereq. or concurrent: CHEM 3729 and CHEM 3739.

CHEM 5832    Solid State Structural Methods    3 s.h.

The determination of structures of biological, organic, and inorganic materials in the solid state. Introduction to the crystalline state, defects, diffraction of waves, powder and single crystal diffraction methods of neutron and x-ray analysis, electron microscopy, and solid state NMR. Two hours lecture, three hours lab.
Prereq.: CHEM 3729.

CHEM 5832L    Solid State Structural Methods Laboratory    0 s.h.

Solid State Structural Methods Laboratory.

CHEM 5836    Quantum Chemistry    3 s.h.

Basic principles of quantum chemistry, with applications to problems in molecular structure, spectroscopy and thermodynamics.
Prereq.: CHEM 3740.

CHEM 5861    Polymer Science 1: Polymer Chemistry and Plastics    3 s.h.

Preparation, characterization, structure-property relationships, morphology, and uses of the major commercial polymers. Two hours lecture, three hours lab.
Prereq.: CHEM 3739.

CHEM 5861L    Polymer Science 1: Polymer Chemistry and Plastics Laboratory    0 s.h.

Polymer Science 1: Polymer Chemistry and Plastics Laboratory.

CHEM 5862    Polymer Science 2: Polymer Rheology, Processing, and Composites    3 s.h.

Polymer rheology, processing methods, and materials characterization. The effects of additives and the major classes of thermoplastic, thermoset, elastomeric, and composite materials. Two hours lecture, three hours lab.
Prereq.: CHEM 5861 or consent of the chairperson.

CHEM 5862L    Polymer Science 2: Polymer Rheology, Processing, and Composites Laboratory    0 s.h.

Polymer Science 2: Polymer Rheology, Processing, and Composites Laboratory.

CHEM 5876    Enzyme Analysis    2 s.h.

Advanced biochemistry laboratory focusing on the methods of enzyme purification and characterization. One hour lecture, two hours lab.
Prereq.: CHEM 3785 or equivalent and CHEM 3785L or equivalent.

CHEM 6911    Advanced Analytical Chemistry 1    3 s.h.

Theory and applications of spectroscopy and theory of chemical separation methods.
Prereq.: CHEM 3739 Physical Chemistry I.

CHEM 6912    Advanced Analytical Chemistry 2    3 s.h.

Applications of chemical separation methods and theory and applications of electrochemistry and electrochemical techniques.
Prereq.: CHEM 3739 Physical Chemistry.

CHEM 6921    Advanced Biochemistry 1    3 s.h.

Protein structure and intermediary metabolism.
Prereq.: CHEM 3720, or concurrently with CHEM 3737 or CHEM 3739.

CHEM 6922    Advanced Biochemistry 2    3 s.h.

A study of metabolic pathways and other biochemical systems at the molecular level.
Prereq.: CHEM 6921.

CHEM 6931    Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 1    3 s.h.

Current theories and types of bonding. Modern structural principles with applications in main-group molecular compounds, coordination compounds, and inorganic solids.
Prereq.: CHEM 3729 Inorganic Chemistry.

CHEM 6932    Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 2    3 s.h.

Transtition metal organometallic chemistry emphasizing molecular structure, bonding methods, characterization, and functional group reactivity. The properties, chemical reactivity, and trends of the elements.
Prereq.: CHEM 5830, CHEM 6931, or permission of instructor.

CHEM 6933    Physical Methods in Structure Determination    3 s.h.

The determination of molecular-level structures of biological, organic, and inorganic compounds in the gas phase, solution, and solid state by diffraction and spectroscopic methods, especially X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. Three hours lecture.
Prereq.: CHEM 5822, CHEM 5832, or permission of instructor.

CHEM 6941    Advanced Organic Chemistry 1    3 s.h.

Principles of chemical bonding and structure in organic molecules, physical organic chemistry, structure of reactive intermediates, stereochemistry, and detailed descriptions of reaction mechanisms.
Prereq.: CHEM 3721 Genetics and CHEM 3740 Physical Chemistry 2.

CHEM 6942    Advanced Organic Chemistry 2    3 s.h.

Detailed study of functional group transformations in organic synthesis as applied to the preparation of complex molecules. Carbon-carbon bond forming reactions, organometallic reagants in organic synthesis, oxidation-reduction chemistry, and multi-step synthesis.
Prereq.: CHEM 6941.

CHEM 6951    Advanced Physical Chemistry 1    3 s.h.

Principles of quantum chemistry and spectroscopy with applications.

CHEM 6952    Advanced Physical Chemistry 2    3 s.h.

Molecular basis of thermodynamics and kinetics.

CHEM 6963    Advanced Polymer Science    3 s.h.

Advanced methods of polymer synthesis and characterization, high performance polymers, polymerization kinetics and mechanisms, polymer processing, materials optimization, and high performance applications. Three hours lecture.
Prereq.: CHEM 3740 and CHEM 5861, or permission of the instructor.

CHEM 6969    Laboratory Problems    2 s.h.

A laboratory course that stresses individual effort in solving chemical problems. Recommended for high school chemistry teachers. Not applicable to the M.S. degree in chemistry. May be repeated up to six semester hours.
Prereq.: An undergraduate minor in chemistry.

CHEM 6971    The Teaching and Learning of Chemistry    3 s.h.

An introduction to the current literature and research problems in the teaching and learning of chemistry. Topics include theories of teaching, learning styles, assessment, problem solving, misconceptions, and the role of laboratories, recitations, and demonstrations in learning chemistry. Also includes examination of these issues as related to teaching biology.

CHEM 6972    Methods of Chemistry Education Research    3 s.h.

Principles of chemistry education research. Issues of problem design, data collection, and data analysis are considered from both quantitative and qualitative frameworks. Methodologies include surveys and questionnaires, think-along protocols, interviews, observations, and action research. Also includes examination of these issues as related to biology.

CHEM 6973    Chemistry and National Science Education Standards    3 s.h.

Implications of national standards for modifying high school chemistry instruction in a variety of classroom situations. Topics include inquiry learning, science and technology literacy, the history and nature of science, preservice science teacher education, assessment, and the impact of standards on advanced placement chemistry.

CHEM 6975    An Introduction to Teaching Chemistry    1 s.h.

A course to prepare graduate students to serve as teaching assistants in both chemistry laboratories and recitations. Topics include laboratory safety (governmental regulations, ACS guidelines, hazardous materials, waste disposal) and practical matters of teaching (active learning, leading discussions, grading, cheating, etc.). Required of all graduate students serving as first-year teaching assistants.

CHEM 6976    Teaching Practicum in General Chemistry    2 s.h.

Teaching strategies in the General Chemistry laboratory. Students will meet with General Chemistry course instructors and must demonstrate proficiency in the material to be presented in CHEM 1515 General Chemistry 1 and CHEM 1516 General Chemistry 2 laboratories. Grading for CHEM 6976 is S/U. May be repeated for a total of six semester hours for CHEM 6976, CHEM 6977, CHEM 6978, and CHEM 6979.
Prereq. or concurrent: CHEM 6975.

CHEM 6977    Teaching Practicum in Allied Health Chemistry    2 s.h.

Teaching strategies in the Allied Health Chemistry laboratory. Students will meet with Allied Health Chemistry course instructors and must demonstrate proficiency in the material to be presented in CHEM 1505 Allied Health Chemistry 1 and CHEM 1506 Allied Health Chemistry 2 laboratories. Grading for CHEM 6977 is S/U. CHEM 6977, CHEM 6978, and CHEM 6979. May be repeated for a total of six semester hours for CHEM 6976.
Prereq. or concurrent: CHEM 6975.

CHEM 6978    Teaching Practicum in Organic Chemistry    2 s.h.

Teaching strategies in the organic chemistry laboratory. Students will meet with organic chemistry course instructors and must demonstrate proficiency in the material to be presented in CHEM 3719 Organic Chemistry 1 and CHEM 3720 Organic Chemistry 2 laboratories. Grading for CHEM 6978 is S/U. May be repeated for a total of six semester hours for CHEM 6976, CHEM 6977, CHEM 6978, and CHEM 6979.
Prereq. or concurrent: CHEM 6975.

CHEM 6979    Teaching Practicum for Chemistry in Modern Living Lab    2 s.h.

Teaching strategies in the Chemistry in Modern Living Laboratory. Students will meet with course coordinator and must demonstrate proficiency in the material to be presented in CHEM 1500L. Grading for CHEM 6979 is S/U. May be repeated for a total of six semester hours for CHEM 6976, CHEM 6977, CHEM 6978, and CHEM 6979.
Prereq. or concurrent: CHEM 6975.

CHEM 6979B    Teaching Practicum for Chemistry in Modern Living Lab 1    2 s.h.

Teaching strategies in the Chemistry in Modern Living Laboratory. Students will meet with course coordinator and must demonstrate proficiency in the material to be presented in CHEM 1500L. Grading for CHEM 6979 is S/U. May be repeated for a total of six semester hours for CHEM 6976, CHEM 6977, CHEM 6978, and CHEM 6979.
Prereq. or concurrent: CHEM 6975.

CHEM 6980    Introduction to Chemical Research    3 s.h.

Principles of chemical research planning, design, execution, and reporting. Includes research proposals, record keeping, written reports, oral presentations, the reviewing process, and professional standards. The application of the principles of chemical research to the student's M.S. research project. Required of all first-year students in the M.S. program in chemistry.

CHEM 6981    Seminar 1    1 s.h.

Preparation of a formal written research proposal and oral presentation of the proposal. Under the guidance of a research supervisor, the student will investigate the background literature and rationale for a project. Required of all first-year students in the M.S. program in chemistry. Hours arranged.
Prereq.: CHEM 6980 and permission of the Chemistry chair.

CHEM 6982    Seminar 2    1 s.h.

Oral presentation and defense of thesis. Hours arranged.
Prereq.: CHEM 6981 and permission of the thesis advisor, or concurrently with six semester hours of CHEM 6990.

CHEM 6985    Fundamental Chemistry for Educators    3 s.h.

Fundamentals of general, organic, and biological chemistry including application to the teaching of science. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory/discussion. Not applicable to the M.S. degree in chemistry.
Prereq.: Admission to the graduate program or permission of instructor.

CHEM 6989    Special Topics in Chemistry Practicum    1-3 s.h.

Topics selected by the faculty from fields of current research, pedagogical interest, or special emphasis. S/U grading option. May be repeated with different topics.

CHEM 6990    Thesis    1-9 s.h.

Hours arranged. May be repeated.

CHEM 6991    Special Topics    1-3 s.h.

Topics selected by the faculty from fields of current research interest or of special emphasis. May be repeated with different topics.