Program Director

G. Jay Kerns
620 Lincoln Building
(330) 941-3310
gkerns@ysu.edu

Program Description                    

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers the M.S. degree in mathematics. Options for this degree include:

  • predoctoral studies,
  • applied mathematics,
  • computer science,
  • secondary mathematics,
  • statistics, and
  • actuarial science.

Graduate faculty members have a broad range of research interests in both pure and applied areas. The curriculum stresses theoretical as well as computational math­ematics and is flexible enough to key a student’s program to individual interests and abilities. Re­ceiving a well-rounded education in mathematics, graduates can pursue a Ph.D., secure a position in government or industry, or further a teaching career. The department has extensive computing facilities that include microcomputers, workstations, mainframe, and access to supercomputers.

Admission Requirements

In addition to the minimum College of Graduate Studies admission requirements, students must also have the following:

COURSETITLES.H.
A cumulative undergraduate cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) in all undergraduate mathematics an statistics courses.
A completed sequence in standard calculus comparable to:
MATH 1571Calculus 14
MATH 1572Calculus 24
MATH 2673Calculus 34
Previous courses in discrete structures and linear algebra comparable to:
MATH 3715Discrete Mathematics3
MATH 3720Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory3
Previous course in abstract algebra comparable to:
MATH 5821Topics in Abstract Algebra4
MATH 5851Topics in Analysis4
The Graduate Record Examination

Students not satisfying all of the above may be admitted with provisional status subject to the approval of the graduate program director and the graduate dean.

Guang-Hwa (Andy) Chang, Ph.D., Professor
Biostatistics

Jozsi Z. Jalics, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Computational neuroscience; mathematical biology; dynamical systems; partial differential equations

G. Jay Kerns, Ph.D., Professor
Signed measures; infinite divisibility; exchangeability in probability and statistics; applications of stochastic processes

Lucy Xiaojing Kerns, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Simultaneous confidence bands; minimum effective doses; benchmark dose methodology

Thomas L. Madsen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Abstract algebra; group theory; representation theory

Nguyet Thi Nguyen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Financial models; Monte Carlo simulation; actuarial science

Anita C. O'Mellan, Ph.D., Professor
Graph theory; combinatorics; early childhood mathematics education

Stephen Rodabaugh, Ph.D., Professor
Foundations of topology and fuzzy logic: point-set, lattice-theoretic, and categorical methods

Thomas Smotzer, Ph.D., Professor
Real analysis; measure theory; operator theory

Angela Spalsbury, Ph.D., Professor
Functional analysis; operator theory; measure theory

Jamal K. Tartir, Ph.D., Professor
Set-theoretic topology

Thomas P. Wakefield, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Character theory; actuarial science

Eric J. Wingler, Ph.D., Professor
Real analysis; complex analysis; operator theory

George Yates, Ph.D., Professor
Applied mathematics; partial differential equations; mathematical biology; nonlinear waves

  • A minimum of 33 semester hours of credit excluding MATH 5821 Topics in Abstract Algebra and MATH 5851 Topics in Analysis
  • A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0
  • Students entering without a prior course in abstract algebra must include MATH 5821 Topics in Abstract Algebra in their program, to be taken in the earliest available semester, and students entering with­out a prior course in theoretical analysis must include MATH 5851 Topics in Analysis in their program, to be taken in the earliest available semester. These courses are not included in the 33-semester-hour minimum requirement.
  • The student’s combined undergraduate and graduate programs must include a mathemat­ics core comprising the following courses or their equivalent:
    COURSETITLES.H.
    MATH 5821Topics in Abstract Algebra (taken in the earliest available semester)4
    MATH 5851Topics in Analysis (taken in the earliest available semester)4
    MATH 5825Advanced Linear Algebra3
    MATH 5852Real Analysis 23
    MATH 6996Mathematical Project1-3
  • Satisfactory performance on written and oral examinations. The subject matter for these examinations must be approved by the Graduate Executive Committee.  Additionally, the following distribution requirements apply:
    • Written exams in MATH 5852, Math 5825 and the first course in the student's chosen course sequence
    • Oral exam on thesis, or oral exam on a project and two courses
    • At least half of the hours of the courses examined must be at the 6900 level
  • At least 17 hours of the student's approved program must be at the 6900 level. In addition to completing the courses which make up the mathematics core, students must complete at least one course sequence for depth and at least fifteen additional hours of elective courses to satisfy the breadth requirement for the degree. The course groupings are described below.
  • MATH 6999 Thesis is highly recommended
  • Before completing 12 semester hours, the student must submit the entire degree program for approval and evaluation by the Graduate Executive Committee in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Subsequent revisions to this program must be approved by the Graduate Executive Committee. An abstract of a proposed thesis must be submitted for approval prior to registering for the course.
  • Students must participate in an exit interview during the semester in which they plan on graduating. The exit interview will be conducted with one or more members of the Graduate Executive Committee and must be scheduled by the student prior to the thesis or project presentation.

Course Sequences for Depth

The description of the recommended course sequences for depth will refer to the following list.  The sequences offered depend upon student interest. 

COURSETITLES.H.
Abstract Algebra
Advanced Topics in Group and Ring Theory
Advanced Topics in Field Theory
Actuarial Mathematics
Theory of Interest
Advanced Data Analysis
Advanced Data Analysis
Linear Models
Advanced Differential Equations
Partial Differential Equations
Mathematical Statistics
Mathematical Statistics 1
Mathematical Statistics 2
Operations Research
Operations Research
Advanced Operations Research
Topology
Topology 1
Topology 2

Predoctoral Studies in Mathematics and Applied Mathematics

COURSETITLES.H.
Advanced Topics in Group and Ring Theory
Advanced Topics in Field Theory
Complex Analysis 1
Real Analysis 2
Topology 1
Advanced Data Analysis
Advanced Differential Equations
Mathematical Statistics 1
Numerical Analysis 2
Operations Research
Electives
Select two or more sequences in areas of interest
Total Semester Hours0

Statistics

COURSETITLES.H.
Core Requirements
STAT 6940Advanced Data Analysis3
STAT 6948Linear Models3
STAT 6943Mathematical Statistics 13
STAT 6944Mathematical Statistics 23
Electives
Select 9 additional hours of statistics courses.9
Total Semester Hours21

Actuarial Science

COURSETITLES.H.
Core Requirements
STAT 5802Theory of Interest3
STAT 6943Mathematical Statistics 13
STAT 6944Mathematical Statistics 23
Electives
Select from statistic and actuarial science course offerings
Total Semester Hours9

Applied Mathematics

COURSETITLES.H.
Core Requirements
Advanced Data Analysis
Advanced Differential Equations
Mathematical Statistics 1
Numerical Analysis 2
Operations Research
Depth Requirement
Select the second course in on e of the sequence
Total Semester Hours0

Secondary/Community College Mathematics

COURSETITLES.H.
Mathematical Foundations
Advanced Data Analysis
or
Mathematical Statistics 1
Advanced Data Analysis
Select one of the following:3
Advanced Topics in Group and Ring Theory
Advanced Topics in Field Theory
Complex Analysis 1
Abstract Analysis 1
Topology 1
Advanced Topics in Group and Ring Theory
Advanced Topics in Field Theory
Those students seeking certification should consult an advisor in the school of Education.
Total Semester Hours3

Computer Science

Students in coursework in computer science in addition to mathematics should plan their graduate program in consultation with advisors in both the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and the Department of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Accelerated MS Mathematics

Undergraduate students can apply for admission into the accelerated program for the MS in Mathematics after completing 78 semester hours with a GPA of 3.3 or higher. After being admitted into the program, students can take a maximum of nine semester hours of graduate coursework that can count toward both an bachelor's and master's degree from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. The courses chosen to count for both undergraduate and graduate coursework must be approved by the Graduate Executive Committee within the Department upon admission into the program. An additional six hours of graduate coursework can be completed as an undergraduate and used exclusively for graduate credit.

Learning Outcomes

Students will develop and demonstrate the ability to reason mathematically by constructing mathematical proofs and recognizing and analyzing accurate numerical data in appropriate core courses. Students will learn that truth in mathematics is verified by careful argument, and will demonstrate the ability to make conjectures and form hypotheses, test the accuracy of their work, and effectively solve problems.

Students will learn to identify fundamental concepts of mathematics as applied to science and other areas of mathematics, and to interconnect the roles of pure and applied mathematics.

Students will demonstrate that they can communicate mathematical ideas effectively, both orally and in writing, by completing a graduate project or thesis involving an investigative mathematical project, together with oral and written examinations.

Students in cooperative doctoral programs will demonstrate their ability to create significant, original mathematics.