The Rayen School of Engineering and Engineering Technology, as part of the College of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, offers a graduate program leading to the Master of Science degree in engineering. Admission to any of the five engineering options, including chemical, civil and environmental, electrical, industrial and systems, and mechanical engineering, is granted to qualified applicants who have been judged to have a good chance of succeeding in the program and obtaining a graduate degree. Several technical concentration areas are available in each option. Students may select a thesis, non-thesis, or management curriculum plan. These opportunities serve the practicing engineer, as well as the student, who wants to pursue advanced graduate study and research. Courses offered on campus are usually held during the evenings. The educational opportunities include traditional classroom and laboratory courses, seminars, and research projects guided by experienced members of the graduate faculty.

Teaching or research assistantships are available to qualified applicants on a competitive basis upon review and recommendation by the home department. In addition, the College of Graduate Studies may offer scholarships or grants-in-aid to qualified students. Students desiring assis­tantships or scholarships must submit an application to the College of Graduate Studies by the specified deadlines.

This description provides an overview of admission and degree requirements, advising, and program plans. Information concerning course scheduling and prospective course offerings can be obtained from the YSU website or the individual engineering departments. Further as­sistance with any matter related to engineering graduate programs may be obtained by telephone, email, or personal visit to the program option coordinator in the student’s area of interest.

Admission Requirements

Degree Programs

Applicants must meet all of the general requirements for admission to the College of Graduate Studies.  Admission to the program is selective and based on the qualifications of the applicant, the needs of the program, and the availability of funding. Applicants with lesser qualifications may be granted provisional graduate student status based on evaluation of their undergraduate records, standardized test (e.g. GRE) results, work experience, and other professional qualifications.

Graduate Assistantships

Students interested in a graduate assistantship position must submit a separate application along with three letters of recommendation to the College of Graduate Studies. Further details are provided elsewhere in the Graduate Catalog under Financial Assistance. The College of Graduate Studies will forward the application to the department. Each engineering department has established a process for evaluating applicants. Applicants should contact the option coordinator in their field of interest for details. Final recommendations are forwarded to the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. Applicants are notified by mail of the dean’s decision.

In cases where the applicant is not fully prepared for their intended graduate program, completion of undergraduate deficiency courses may be required. This is common when the applicant’s undergraduate degree is in a different discipline than the intended graduate program. Such applicants may be granted provisional admission as long as they require no more than 9 semester hours of undergraduate deficiency courses. In addition, some programs may require stronger evidence of academic ability (e.g. higher GPA) for applicants having undergraduate degrees outside the discipline.

Non-Degree Admission

Students meeting all requirements for admission to the College of Graduate Studies, but who do not intend to pursue a Master of Science degree, may apply for non-degree admission. In addition, an applicant whose academic record does not meet the required standards for admission to a Master of Science program may apply for non-degree admission to the College of Graduate Studies. For students wishing to pursue a Master of Science in Engineering degree, non-degree admission provides an opportunity to demonstrate his/her academic capability. Non-degree students completing nine semester hours of appropriate graduate courses with grades of B or better may apply for admission to a specific engineering degree option with regular or provisional status to continue his/her study for the Master of Science in Engineering.

Advisement

The Rayen School of Engineering and Engineering Technology requires an advisor for each individual graduate student. An advisor is recommended by the option coordinator in the student’s discipline and assigned by the College of Graduate Studies upon acceptance. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate contact with his or her advisor, and this should be done as soon as possible before registering for the first time and at the time of course registration each semester. The student, with the help of his or her advisor, shall develop a study plan that includes goals and desired outcomes, and a coursework plan. The plan may be revised, if necessary, as the study progresses, with the approval of the advisor and option coordinator.

Chemical Engineering

Option Coordinator

Douglas M. Price
2068 Moser Hall
(330) 941-3019
dmprice@ysu.edu

Option Description

Chemical engineers apply scientific and engineering knowledge to design and produce a wide variety of consumer and industrial products, including food, fuels, plastics, pharmaceuticals, etc. Chemical engineers find exciting global career opportunities in the chemical, biomedical, nuclear, pharmaceutical, and energy fields. Graduate study in chemical engineering provides students with the scientific and professional knowledge necessary for their field of interest and develops student abilities to formulate solutions to new and complex problems in the context of current environmental, social, and economic considerations. These objectives are accomplished by flexible plans of study designed to meet the needs of the program’s graduate students. The program includes thesis, non-thesis, and engineering management plans.

Facilities for advanced study and research are located in Moser Hall, which houses a variety of well-equipped laboratories. These include the heat transfer lab, distillation lab, and biochemical engineering lab. In addition, the college computer lab provides access to a large number of modern PCs with high-speed internet connections.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Option Coordinator

Anwarul Islam
2445 Moser Hall
(330) 941-3026
aaislam@ysu.edu

Program Description

Civil and environmental engineers apply scientific and engineering knowledge to protect and improve the infrastructure, public health and environment. Graduate study in civil and environmental en­gineering provides students with advanced scientific and engineering knowl­edge in their field of interest and develops their abilities to formulate solutions to new and complex problems in the context of current environmental, social, and economic consid­erations. These objectives are accomplished by flexible plans of study designed to meet the needs of individual graduate students. Graduates find fulfilling careers in public and private industries and consulting practices, and are prepared for doctoral-level work leading to research/teaching careers. The program includes thesis, non-thesis, and management plans. The civil and environmental engineering program offers opportunities for advanced study in two main areas:

  • structural/geotechnical engineering and
  • environmental/water resources engineering.

Facilities for advanced study and research are located in Moser Hall, which houses a variety of well-equipped laboratories. These include the SMART Lab, strength of materials lab, hydraulics/fluid mechanics lab, environmental engineering lab, geotechnical engineering lab, and concrete mixtures lab. In addition, the college computer lab provides access to a large number of modern PCs equipped with high-speed internet connections and latest software for modeling in various fields of research.

Electrical Engineering

Option Coordinator

Jalal Jalali
2055 Moser Hall
(330) 941-3012
jjalali@ysu.edu  

Option Description

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering provides opportunities for post-­baccalaureate study toward the Master of Science in Engineering. These opportunities serve the practicing engineer as well as the student who wants to pursue advanced graduate study and research. Thesis, non-thesis, and management options/plans are available. Areas of study include control systems, digital systems, computer engineering, RF communica­tions, computer-aided design, device and circuit modeling, solid-state devices, sensors, power systems and energy, power electronics, electromagnetic fields, electromechanical systems, and system analy­sis and design. The student is encouraged to interact with the faculty and explore these oppor­tunities.

Industrial and Systems Engineering

Option Coordinator

Hojjat Mehri
2500 Moser Hall
(330) 941- 3023
hmehri@ysu.edu  

Option Description

The industrial engineering program option provides opportunities for interdisciplinary gradu­ate studies toward the Master of Science in Engineering with specialization in engineering man­agement or industrial/manufacturing systems engineering. Students can also pursue study focused on specialized areas of industrial and systems engineering, such as operations research.

All study plans are interdisciplinary and include some coursework from outside the depart­ment. They are designed to serve practicing engineers, as well as those students who want to pursue advanced graduate studies beyond the Master of Science in engineering.

Mechanical Engineering

Option Coordinator

Virgil Solomon
2505 Moser Hall
(330) 941- 1730
vcsolomon@ysu.edu

Option Description

The program option in mechanical engineering offers the Master of Science in Engineering with specialization within the general mechanical engineering disciplines. Specializations are available in the areas of mechanical analysis/design and fluid thermal systems. The thesis and non-thesis plans are for students who seek to deepen their theoretical knowledge and strengthen their ability to solve more advanced engineering problems, while the management plan is for those who wish to include managerial training in their program of preparation.

The Department of Mechanical Engineering has excellent computer and laboratory facili­ties that provide for the following design and research capabilities: solid modeling, FEA in stress analysis, structural dynamics and heat transfer, experimental stress analysis, vibrations and noise control, computational and experimental heat transfer and fluid dynamics, and advanced machine design.

Chemical Engineering

Martin A. Abraham, Ph.D., Professor
Green engineering; sustainability

Pedro Cortes, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Structure-property relationships of polymers; composites and hybrid materials; smart materials and structures; development of chem-bio sensing platforms based on carbon nanotubes

Jeanette M. Garr, Ph.D., Professor

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Shakir Husain, Ph.D., Professor
Pavement materials; design; construction

AKM Anwarul Islam, Ph.D., Professor, Chair
Impact of blast on highway bridges; use of CFRP in enhancing structural strength of concrete members; structural health monitoring of bridges using wireless sensor network

Jai K. Jung, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Underground infrastructure sustainability; soil dynamics and earthquake engineering; sustainable construction engineering; spatial assessment of natural/anthropogenic hazards

Suresh Sharma, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Complex hydrologic and water quality modeling using various types of data driven, conceptual, physically based and distributed and semi-distributed watershed models in climate change/variability context

Anthony S. Vercellino, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Water/wastewater treatment; water reuse applications; membrane filtration processes; anti-microbial compounds

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Jalal Jalali, Ph.D., Professor, Chair
Electromagnetic; power systems; power electronics; FR engineering; energy efficiency

Frank Xiying Li, Ph.D., Professor
Electron spin resonance imaging; EMC, RF, and software engineering; networks; applied magnetic fields

Faramarz Doc Mossayebi, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Control systems; nonlinear dynamic systems; chaos theory; digital signal processing

Industrial and Systems Engineering

Martin Cala, Ph.D., Professor
Human factors; quality and productivity

Brett P. Conner, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Materials and process development for additive manufacturing also known as 3D printing; functionally graded materials (FGMs); high-strain rate behavior of AM materials; 3D printing of metal casting tooling; business models for additive manufacturing

Mechanical Engineering

Kyosung Choo, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Jet impingement; two-phase flow; electronics cooling; energy audit of building and data center; microchannel heat exchanger; thermal management of energy systems

Hazel Marie, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Chair
FEA/CFD modeling applied to solid-fluid interaction of thin film lubrication sealing; mechanical material modeling of soft biological tissue

Stefan Moldovan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Multi-scale computational fluid dynamics; experimental techniques as applied to crystal growth within reactors, finger seals, hydrodynamic bearings and dampers; wet friction materials in torque converters

Jae Joong Ryu, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Mechanical contact, fatigue, fracture, wear and environmental corrosion on structured surfaces under applied forces; fundamental investigation of tribo-corrosion of metallic joint replacements in physiological environment

Elvin B. Shields, Ph.D., Professor

Virgil C. Solomon, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Synthesis of shape memory alloys, ceramic-metal composites and nanostructures and their characterization using metallography, thermal analysis and analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques.

The Master of Science in Engineering may be characterized as being both career-oriented and flexible. Program plans and options are available to accommodate the needs of nearly every engineering graduate student. Graduate students enrolled in any of the engineering graduate programs must complete:

  • 30 semester hours for the thesis plan,
  • 33 semester hours for the nonthesis plan, or
  • 36 semester hours for the management plan.

The degree requirements consist of core courses, technical courses, and project courses. The management plan also requires a series of business courses. These degree programs are designed to provide graduate students with the knowledge and skills to excel in professional careers and/or pursue a PhD or doctorate degree in engineering. To obtain a list of core and technical course requirements for a particular engineering discipline, students should contact the option coordinator for the program of interest.

Program Plans

Thesis Plan

Graduate students choosing the thesis plan are required to complete 30 semester hours of gradu­ate coursework. This generally consists of:

  • six to nine semester hours of core courses,
  • 15-18 semester hours of technical concentration courses, and
  • six semester hours of thesis.

This plan is strongly recom­mended for all candidates who wish to continue their graduate studies beyond the master’s degree. The thesis provides firsthand experience with experimental design, literature searches, research methodol­ogy, technical report writing, and oral presentation of results. Additionally, the thesis option can lead the graduate student to a higher level of expertise in the chosen area of specialization.

Non-thesis Plan

The non-thesis plan is designed for students who wish to enhance their knowledge and skills to succeed in careers as practicing engineers, but are unlikely to pursue a PhD or doctorate degree. A total of 33 semester hours of coursework is required for this plan. In addition to 6-9 semester hours of core courses, every student enrolled in this option is required to complete 21-24 semester hours of technical courses related to their discipline, and a 3-semester-hour graduate project course. A graduate student enrolled in a graduate project course will be required to defend the results of his or her project by giving a presentation to the engineering faculty and students.

Management Plan

Students who have been in the work arena and are moving into an engineering management role may wish to choose the management plan. A total of 36 semester hours of coursework is required for this plan. This consists of:

  • 6-9 semester hours of core courses,
  • 9-12 semester hours of business courses,
  • 12-18 semester hours of technical courses, and
  • a 3-semester-hour graduate project.

A graduate student enrolled in a graduate project course will be required to defend the results of his or her project by giving a presentation to the engineering faculty and students.

Chemical Engineering Requirements

At the time of initial enrollment, the student will select a program plan (thesis, non-thesis, or management) and technical area of interest (e.g. chemical processes, biochemical, environmental, materials). The degree requirements for each program plan are listed in the general description of the Master of Science in Engineering program. A list of required courses and pos­sible electives for each plan may be obtained from the graduate program’s option coordinator.

In cooperation with an assigned faculty advisor, each student will establish a set of academic goals and desired outcomes, and a coursework plan to meet those objectives. Upon completion of the graduate program, all students will complete either a written or an oral assessment of the effectiveness of the program in meeting their established goals and outcomes.

Thesis students who have registered for all required thesis hours and have completed all course requirements but have not finished the thesis are required to maintain current student status if they expect to utilize any University service (e.g., parking, computers, library, advisors’ assistance, thesis defense, etc.). This can normally be accomplished by registering for at least one hour of thesis credit.

Civil and Environmental Engineering Requirements

At the time of initial enrollment, the student will select a program plan (thesis, non-thesis, or management) and technical concentration area (structural/geotechnical or environmental/water resources ). The requirements for each program plan are listed in the general description of the Master of Science in Engineering program. Lists of required courses and pos­sible electives for each plan may be obtained from the graduate program coordinator.

In cooperation with an assigned faculty advisor, each student will establish a set of academic goals and desired outcomes, and a coursework plan to meet those objectives. Upon completion of the graduate program, all students will complete either a written or an oral assessment of the effectiveness of the program in meeting their established goals and outcomes.

Thesis students, who have registered for all required thesis hours and have completed all course requirements but have not finished the thesis, are required to maintain current student status if they expect to utilize any University service (e.g., parking, computers, library, advisors’ assistance, thesis defense, etc.). This can normally be accomplished by registering for at least one hour of thesis credit.

Non-thesis students must complete a graduate project under the guidance of a faculty member. Students with management option should consult the graduate program coordinator to develop their coursework plan.

Electrical Engineering Requirements

The basic degree requirements for each program plan are described under the general program description for the Master of Science in Engineering. Descriptions of course requirements and available electives for each program plan in the electrical engineering master’s program can be obtained from the graduate option coordinator.

Within the first semester of graduate study, every graduate student must complete an option plan form signed by the student, academic advisor, and the department graduate option coordinator. The student may seek another advisor in case of interest changes. Likewise, the student-advisor relationship may be terminated at the advisor’s recommendation. The graduate option coordinator is available to discuss these and other issues as appropriate.

Selected electrical engineering (ECEN) graduate courses are offered each semester based on the available teaching resources and student needs. Each graduate candidate is required to receive advising each semester from the department graduate option coordinator before registration. Based on the graduate student’s academic background, work experience, and academic goals, the department graduate option coordinator may approve a student’s request to substitute a graduate course not listed on the applicable program plan description.

Industrial and Systems Engineering Requirements

At the time of initial enrollment, the student will select a program plan (thesis, non-thesis, or management) and technical concentration area (engineering management, industrial/manufacturing systems engineering, operations research, etc.) The requirements for each option are enumerated in the general description of the Master of Science in Engineering program. Lists of required courses and possible electives for each plan may be obtained from the graduate program option coordinator. Every graduate student is responsible for selecting an area of specialization by signing a special form designed for this purpose. A student may change his or her area of concentration or program of study in consultation with his or her advisor.

In cooperation with an assigned faculty advisor, each student will establish a set of academic goals and desired outcomes, and a coursework plan to meet those objectives. Courses taken without the permission of the advisor may not be used to meet the degree requirements.

Thesis students who have registered for all required thesis hours and have completed all course requirements but have not finished the thesis are required to maintain current student status if they expect to utilize any University service (e.g., parking, computers, library, advisors’ assis­tance, thesis defense, etc.). This can normally be accomplished by registering for at least one hour of thesis credit in ISEN 6990 Special Topics.

Mechanical Engineering Requirements

At the time of initial enrollment, the student will select a program plan (thesis, non-thesis, or management) and technical concentration area (mechanical analysis/design of rigid and deformable bodies, analysis/design of thermal-fluid systems, etc.). The requirements for each option are listed in the general description of the Master of Science in Engineering program. Lists of required courses and possible electives for each plan may be obtained from the graduate program option coordinator. In cooperation with an assigned faculty adviser, each student will establish a set of academic goals and desired outcomes, and a coursework plan to meet those objectives.

Thesis students who have registered for all required thesis hours and have completed all course requirements but have not finished the thesis are required to maintain current student status if they expect to utilize any University service (e.g. parking, computers, library, advisors’ assistance, thesis defense, etc.). This can normally be accomplished by registering for at least one hour of thesis credit in MECH 6990 Thesis.

Learning Outcomes Chemical Engineering

  • an ability to formulate and solve advanced engineering problems;
  • an ability to apply advanced knowledge of chemistry, biology and/or material science in chemical engineering.
  • an ability to design and conduct research projects;
  • technical writing and oral communication skills.

Learning Outcomes: Civil and Environmental Engineering

  • an ability to formulate and solve advanced civil engineering problems; ;
  • an ability to apply knowledge in a specialized area of civil and environmental engineering;
  • an abillity to design and conduct research projects;
  • an understanding of business fundamentals, including project planning and management, asset management, leadership, and entrepreneurship;
  • an understanding of the role of engineers in society.

Learning Outcomes: Electrical Engineering

The Department graduate program offers diverse educa­tional opportunities with its high-standard multi­disci­plinary curriculum and prepares its students to:Advance their mathematical knowledge and application of electrical engineering;

  • Obtain depth of knowledge in specific electrical engineering disciplines;
  • Conduct research and develop new ideas for engineering practice;
  • Understand methodologies and their applications;
  •  Enhance their technical writing and oral communication skills

Graduate Courses

CEEN 5820    Pavement Material and Design    3 s.h.

Design methods for flexible, rigid and other wheel-supporting pavements to include investigation, testing and preparation of subgrade, base course and pavement materials, design of various pavement mixtures, stresses in pavements, pavement design, and strengthening existing pavements.
Prereq.: CEEN 3720 and CEEN 4881.

CEEN 5829    Civil Engineering Materials - Concrete    3 s.h.

A course designed to broaden the student's understanding of Portland Cement Concrete as a construction material. Topics include the study of cement, hydration of cement, aggregates, admixtures for concrete, mix design handling and placing, curing and properties of Portland Cement Concrete. Testing of Concrete, quality control and special concretes are also included. A library research paper on a concrete-related topic of the student's choice is required.
Prereq.: CEEN 3749 or permission of instructor.

CEEN 5832    Natural Systems Engineering    3 s.h.

Introduction to the features, functions and values of natural aquatic systems, and engineering approaches to analysis and restoration design. Focus on wetlands and streams. Topics include regulations, wetland delineation, constructed wetland design, basic stream geomorphology, and stream restoration design.
Prereq.: CEEN 3736 or permission of instructor.

CEEN 5837    Environmental Engineering Design    3 s.h.

Theory and design of unit operations and processes for treatment of drinking water and municipal wastewater.
Prereq.: CEEN 3736.

CEEN 5849    Structural Analysis 2    3 s.h.

Analysis of statically indeterminate beams, trusses, bents and multistory frames, utilizing concepts of strain energy, virtual work, slope-deflection, and moment distribution. Introduction to matrix methods of analysis using force and displacement methods.
Prereq.: CEEN 3749.

CEEN 5855    Reinforced Concrete Design    3 s.h.

An introduction to the behavior, analysis, and design of reinforced concrete members. Included are singly and doubly reinforced beams, tee-beams, slabs, short and long columns.
Prereq.: CEEN 3749.

CEEN 5856    Steel Design    3 s.h.

An introduction to the behavior and design of steel structures. Included is the design of rolled and built-up tension members, beams, columns, beam-columns, welded and bolted connections.
Prereq.: CEEN 3749.

CEEN 5877    Systems Engineering and Project Management    3 s.h.

Systems approach to engineering design; non-linear models; linear programming; dynamic programming; network analysis; project management.
Prereq.: MATH 3705.

CEEN 5882    Foundation Engineering    3 s.h.

Analysis and design of various foundations, including abutments, piers, piles, and footings; slope stability of embankments.
Prereq.: CEEN 4881 and CEEN 5855.

CEEN 5883    Bridge Engineering    3 s.h.

Analysis and design of concrete and steel bridges; specifications and code requirements; design detailing; effects of natural and man-made hazards on bridges; implications of bridge failures.
Prereq.: CEEN 5855 and CEEN 5856.

CEEN 5884    Solid and Hazardous Waste Management    3 s.h.

Sources, characteristics, handling and disposal options for solid waste and hazardous waste; topics include regulations, health effects, waste minimization, collection systems, landfill design, treatment and processing methods, and site assessment.
Prereq.: CEEN 3736.

CEEN 6910    Advanced Strength of Materials    3 s.h.

The basic methods of structural mechanics, such as conditions of equilibrium and compatibility, stress-strain relations. General treatment of energy principles including virtual work, minimum potential energy; applications to statically determinate and indeterminate systems such as rings, curved beams, plates, and other elastic systems.

CEEN 6920    Wetlands Engineering    3 s.h.

Wetland characteristics-soils, hydrology, and vegetation; wetland functions and values; regulations; planning, theory, design and construction of created and constructed wetlands; applications in wetland mitigation, wastewater treatment, and pollution control.
Prereq.: CEEN 3736 Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering or equivalent.

CEEN 6921    Groundwater and Surface Water Modeling    3 s.h.

Mathematical simulation of hydrodynamic processes and pollutant transport in subsurface and surface water environments.
Prereq.: CEEN 3716 Fluid Mechanics and CEEN 3736 Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering.

CEEN 6930    Sediment and Contaminant Transport    3 s.h.

Understanding of sediment and contaminant transport in fluvial environments. Topics include sediment characteristics, incipient motion, scour, bankfull discharge, advection, and mixing.
Prereq.: CEEN 3717 or equivalent.

CEEN 6941    Structural Mechanics    3 s.h.

Study of beams under lateral load; beams with combined lateral load and thrust; buckling beams on elastic foundations; applications of Fourier series and virtual work principles to beam type structures; stress and strain in three dimensions; applications to flexure of beams and plates and to constrained torsion; elements of engineering theory of plates.

CEEN 6947    Finite Element Analysis    3 s.h.

An introduction to finite element techniques as applied to problems in structural mechanics. Direct and variational methods of element formulation with application to beams, beam columns, frames, arches, thin plates, and shells.

CEEN 6951    Construction Project Management    3 s.h.

An integrated approach to construction project management. Advanced topics of Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) and Critical Path Method (CPM) and its application in construction project scheduling. Resource allocation and leveling, construction cost control, computer simulation of construction operations, and expert systems construction.

CEEN 6952    Foundation Engineering    3 s.h.

Principles of mechanics of materials applied to foundation problems; stresses and deformations in soils, consolidation theory; shallow and deep foundation design.

CEEN 6953    Flow Through Porous Media    3 s.h.

Analysis of seepage volume and stresses due to flow of water through soils in connection with dams, slopes, excavations, subsurface drainage, and wells.

CEEN 6956    Advanced Soil Mechanics    3 s.h.

Development of shear strength theories, Mohr-Coulomb-Hvorslev equation, critical path concept, stability of slopes, lateral earth-pressure theories, development of bearing capacity equations.
Prereq.: CEEN 4881 or equivalent.

CEEN 6957    Structural Stability    3 s.h.

A study of the elastic stability of engineering structures, beam columns, static buckling of elastic beams, frames, plates, and shells, dynamic stability of beams and plates.

CEEN 6958    Structural Dynamics    3 s.h.

Analysis of the response of structures to air blasts and earthquake motions; development of both the normal mode and frequency response methods in dealing with periodic and nonperiodic excitations.

CEEN 6959    Advanced Steel Design    3 s.h.

Advanced topics in the structural design of girders, frames, and trusses. Light gauge metal structures. Use of modern alloys and hybrid systems.

CEEN 6961    Advanced Concrete Design    3 s.h.

Consideration of advanced design techniques for reinforced concrete members and structures such as composite and prestressed concrete beams, box girders, and slabs.

CEEN 6965    Special Topics    3 s.h.

The application, in civil engineering, of special topics selected by the faculty from fields of current research interest or special emphasis. May be repeated up to six semester hours.

CEEN 6967    Biological Treatment Processes    3 s.h.

Theory and design of biological processes used in the treatment of municipal and industrial wastewaters, and in the remediation of hazardous wastes.
Prereq.: CEEN 3736.

CEEN 6972    Advanced Topics in Environmental Engineering    3 s.h.

Advanced concepts related to the transport, reaction, phase distribution, and fate of pollutants in both the natural environment and treatment systems.
Prereq.: CEEN 3736.

CEEN 6973    Watershed Modeling    3 s.h.

Application of hydrologic principles for modeling point and non-point source pollution at the watershed scale; the nutrient and sediment transport simulation using SWAT model; understanding the fundamental processes of pollutant movement through the soils and overland flow; application of data driven modeling in Water Resources Engineering.

CEEN 6975    Physical and Chemical Treatment Processes    3 s.h.

Theory and design of physical and chemical processes used in the treatment of water supplies, wastewater, and hazardous wastes.
Prereq.: CEEN 3736.

CEEN 6976    Design of Small Dams    3 s.h.

Flood routing, reservoir engineering. Hydraulic design of small gravity, earth fill and rock fill dams, spillways, and energy dissipaters.
Prereq.: CEEN 3717 and CEEN 6977.

CEEN 6977    Hydrology    3 s.h.

Precipitation; hydrologic abstractions; runoff; urban and small watershed hydrology; frequency analysis; digital simulation.

CEEN 6978    Water Resources Policy and Management    3 s.h.

International, national, and local water resources case studies, laws, policies, and management strategies are discussed. The need and demand for water; technical, economic, financial, social, environmental, and political considerations; data requirements; multipurpose projects.

CEEN 6979    Water Quality Modeling    3 s.h.

Mathematical modeling of physical, chemical, and biological processes in natural systems; development of computer models to simulate the fate and transport of pollutants in lakes, streams, and estuaries; application of models to evaluate water resource management options.
Prereq.: CEEN 3736 Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering.

CEEN 6989    Graduate Projects    1-3 s.h.

Special projects involving research, analysis, design, or other independent investigation, undertaken by the M.S. student under the direction of a graduate faculty member with the approval of the department chair. Credit will be determined in each case based on the nature and extent of the project.

CEEN 6990    Thesis    1-9 s.h.

Hours arranged. May be repeated.

CHEN 5805    Principles of Biomedical Engineering    3 s.h.

Application of engineering principles and methods of analysis to processes in the human body. Rheological, physical and chemical properties of body fluids. Dynamics of the circulatory system. The human thermal system. Transport through cell membranes. Analysis and design of artificial organs.
Prereq.: CHEN 2684 or consent of instructor.

CHEN 5810    The Business of Engineering    3 s.h.

Industrial processing facilities, and the engineers and business people that run them. Decision-making perspectives and the technical and communication skills of each group are compared. Focus is on quality control, R&D, and efficiency.

CHEN 5811    Advanced Transport Phenomena    3 s.h.

Development of basic differential balance equations for mass, momentum and energy. Analytical and approximate solutions to the equation of change with application to the analysis of common engineering problems.
Prereq.: CHEN 3786.

CHEN 5820    Industrial Pollution Control    3 s.h.

Types, sources and effects of industrial and hazardous waste; principles of industrial and hazardous waste control; discussion and design of biological, physical, and chemical treatment processes.
Prereq.: CHEN 2684 or consent of instructor.

CHEN 5821    Fundamentals of Polymer Science    3 s.h.

The survey of polymerization mechanisms, polymer structure-property relationships, transport properties, flammability-related plasticizers and solvents as well as design applications.
Prereq.: CHEN 2684 or consent of instructor.

CHEN 5830    Nuclear Reactors    3 s.h.

Neutron interactions and scattering; moderation ratio, the steady state reactor core and four factor equation, the diffusion equation for various reactor geometries and the reflected reactor core.
Prereq.: CHEN 3726 or consent of instructor.

CHEN 5835    Introduction to Nuclear Fusion    3 s.h.

Fusion reactors; the kinetics of fusion reactions. Plasma confinement technology.
Prereq.: CHEN 3726.

CHEN 5845    Corrosion Engineering    3 s.h.

Introduction to causes and forms of corrosion, corrosion rate calculations, electrode potentials, electrochemistry, corrosion testing, and effects of corrosion on mechanical properties. Theory and use of corrosion inhibition methods.
Prereq.: CHEN 2684.

CHEN 5850    Industrial Processes    3 s.h.

A fundamental approach to the design of industrial chemical processes. Emphasis upon flow-charting, chemical reactions, separations involved, thermodynamics, and economic considerations. Food and pharmaceutical processing is a major focus.
Prereq.: CHEN 2684 or consent of instructor.

CHEN 5854    Corrosion Engineering    3 s.h.

Introduction to causes and forms of corrosion, corrosion rate calculations, electrode potentials, electro-chemistry, corrosion testing, and effects of corrosion on mechanical properties. Theory and use of corrosion inhibition methods.
Prereq.: Junior or Senior Standing or Approval of the Instructor.

CHEN 5883    Mathematical Methods in Chemical Engineering    3 s.h.

The applications of advanced mathematics to the solution of chemical engineering problems. Topics covered include treatment and interpretation of engineering data, modeling of chemical engineering systems and formulation of ordinary and partial differential equations governing chemical engineering operations and their solutions by use of numerical and analytical techniques.
Prereq.: CHEN 3786.

CHEN 5886    Nuclear Reactor Design    3 s.h.

The steady state reactor core; four-factor equation, resonance escape probability, neutron flux distribution in various geometrics, two-group and multigroup theories. Transient reactor behavior and control; effect of delayed neutrons, fission product poisoning, nuclear fuels, nuclear heat transfer and burnout problems, reactor economy; fuel burnup and power cost. Thermal breeder and fast reactors. Neutron flux distribution measurements. Radiation detection and monitoring.
Prereq.: CHEN 3726 or consent of instructor.

CHEN 6981    Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering    3 s.h.

Advances topics in chemical reaction engineering including non-elementary reaction kinetics, reactor design for autocatalytic reactions, temperature and energy effects in chemical reactions, heterogeneous catalysis, catalyst preparation, fabrication and activation.
Prereq.: CHEN 4880.

CHEN 6983    Modern Power Sources    3 s.h.

Analytical and descriptive study of modern power plants. Combustion and environmental problems with fossil-fueled power plants. Electromagnetic circuits and devices with emphasis on the principles of electromechanical energy conversions.

CHEN 6984    Nuclear Fission and Fusion Power Sources    3 s.h.

Energy available from fission and fusion nuclear reactions, on setting and maintaining chain reaction. Mechanical and electromagnetic confinement techniques. Reactor design, heat removal, and safety problems.

CHEN 6985    Electromechanical Motion Devices    3 s.h.

Thermodynamics of batteries, and electric and fuel cells. Power from nuclear isotopes. Features common to rotating electromagnetic fields. Analysis and design of electromechanical power components.

CHEN 6990    Thesis    1-9 s.h.

Research selected and supervised by departmental advisor. May be repeated for a maximum of nine semester hours.
Prereq.: Acceptance by departmental committee.

ECEN 5807    Advanced Digital and Analog Circuits    3 s.h.

Chip circuitry for devices such as BJT, CMOS, and ECL-based digital logic chips. Switching devices such as SCRs, triacs, and timers. Switching power supplies. Power amplifiers. Applications and specifications of off-the-shelf IC devices. Computer-aided design and analysis.
Prereq.: ECEN 3772.

ECEN 5808    Advanced Signals and Systems    3 s.h.

Communication and control system modeling and simulations; signal analysis in continuous-time, discrete-time and frequency domains. Advanced communication system applications.
Prereq.: ECEN 3710 and MATH 3705.

ECEN 5816    Theory and Fabrication of Solid-State Devices    3 s.h.

An introductory study of physical theory, design, and fabrication of discrete devices and integrated circuits. Electronic properties of semiconductors such as carrier concentration, energy gap, mobility, lifetime. Techniques of fabrication such as oxidation, diffusion, alloying ion implantation, metallization, masking.
Prereq.: ECEN 3741 and ECEN 3771.

ECEN 5817    Sensor Design and Application    3 s.h.

Designs and applications for measurement and control; includes electro-chemical, -mechanical, -optical, and -thermal transducers. Signal conditioning and smart sensors.
Prereq.: ECEN 3771 or ECEN 3717.

ECEN 5830    Digital Signal Processing    3 s.h.

Discrete time signals and systems; discrete, fast, and inverse Fourier transforms. Digital filter analysis and design, digital signal processing applications. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
Prereq.: ECEN 3710.

ECEN 5835    Computer Architecture with VHDL    4 s.h.

Use of hardware description languages to design computer components and systems. Arithmetic and logic units, control units, VHDL models for memories and busses, interfacing, transfer design. Survey of modern computer systems.
Prereq.: ECEN 3734.

ECEN 5840    Electric Power Systems    4 s.h.

Modeling of power system components. Power flow, faults, protection systems, and stability problems. Special projects and laboratory experiments including CAD applications for analysis, design, and simulation of power system networks. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
Prereq. or concurrent: ECEN 4844.

ECEN 5850    Communications Applications    3 s.h.

Applicable technologies and "real-world" communication components and systems. Design and analysis tools. Emerging technologies, "killer apps", networking, data acquisition, and convergence.
Prereq.: ECEN 3710 or ECEN 5808.

ECEN 5860    Energy Radiation and Propagation    3 s.h.

Examination of dipole, loop aperture, reflector, lens, surface wave, traveling wave, and other antennas; array theory; radiation resistance, directivity, and input impedance. Investigation of theoretical and practical applications of fiber optics.
Prereq.: ECEN 3742 and 21 s.h. of ECEN courses.

ECEN 5879    Computer-Aided Design    3 s.h.

The design, analysis, and modeling of linear and nonlinear networks and systems using a simulation and modeling computer program. Development and use of library models of devices, subcircuits, and subsystems.
Prereq.: ECEN 2611 and 21 s.h. of ECEN courses.

ECEN 5890    Power Electronics    4 s.h.

SCRs, rectifier circuits, commutation techniques, AC controllers, converters, and inverters. Special projects and laboratory experiments including computer applications for analysis, design, and simulation of power electronics network. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
Prereq.: ECEN 3771 and 21 s.h. of ECEN courses.

ECEN 6900    Seminar    1-3 s.h.

Designed to examine topics in the field. May be repeated once.

ECEN 6901    Control Systems 1    3 s.h.

Fundamental concepts in linear system theory. matrix algebra, linear vector spaces, linear operators. Input-output and state-space models for continuous-time systems; canonical forms. Solutions of state space equations. Characteristics of linear systems: stability; controllability and observability. State variable feedback; introduction to state estimation.

ECEN 6902    Control Systems 2    3 s.h.

State-variable feedback techniques; design of state estimators. Design using polynomial equations. Design of digital controllers: discrete equivalents and direct methods. Introduction to implementation of digital control systems.
Prereq.: ECEN 6901.

ECEN 6903    Advanced Control Systems    3 s.h.

Introduction to nonlinear control systems: basic nonlinear phenomena, describing functions, Lyapunov stability, linearization techniques. Introduction to linear optimal quadratic control; stochastic modeling and Kalman filtering.
Prereq.: ECEN 6902.

ECEN 6911    Electromagnetic Fields 1    3 s.h.

Solution of boundary value problems in general form. Laplace, Poisson, and diffusion and wave equations in orthogonal coordinate systems.

ECEN 6912    Electromagnetic Fields 2    3 s.h.

Solution of boundary value problems in general form. Laplace, Poisson, and diffusion and wave equations in orthogonal coordinate systems.

ECEN 6933    Digital Systems: VHDL Design    3 s.h.

Local minimization, design of combinational networks; design of synchronous and asynchronous sequential machines; design of digital systems using VHD, modeling combinational and sequential networks, compilation, simulation, and synthesis of VHDL codes.

ECEN 6934    Digital Systems: Computer Arithmetic    3 s.h.

Number system representations: standard and unconventional formats. Design of two-operand and multi-operand fast adders. High-speed multiplication and division algorithms. Floating-point numbers, algorithms, and error control. Hardware algorithms for function evaluation.
Prereq.: ECEN 6933.

ECEN 6981    Electric Power System Engineering    3 s.h.

The formulation of equations to study electric power network problems, including feeders, power flow, short circuits, protection systems, and stability. The study of power system over voltages and transients caused by short circuits, switching, and lightning. The application of numerical techniques to study and design special projects using digital computations.

ECEN 6983    Modern Power Sources    3 s.h.

Analytical and descriptive study of modern power plants. Combustion and environmental problems with fossil-fueled power plants. Electromagnetic circuits and devices with emphasis on the principles of electromechanical energy conversions.
Cross-listed: CHEN 6983 and MECH 6983.

ECEN 6985    Electromechanical Motion Devices    3 s.h.

Thermodynamics of batteries, and of electric and fuel cells. Power from nuclear isotopes. Features common to rotating electromagnetic fields. Analysis and design of electromechanical power components. Logic circuit design with I/O structure and interface.
Cross-listed: CHEN 6985 and MECH 6985.

ECEN 6986    Power Electronics Circuits and Devices    3 s.h.

The design and analysis of power electronic circuits using solid-state switching devices. Topics include power semiconductor diodes and transistors, diode circuits and controlled rectifiers, thyristors, communication techniques, AC voltage controllers, and switching regulators, with applications.

ECEN 6987    Power Electronics and Industrial Drives    3 s.h.

The design and analysis of power electronic circuits and systems, static switches, power supplies, AC and DC drives, and protection of power electronic devices and circuits.

ECEN 6988    Nano- and Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems    3 s.h.

NEMS and MEMS fabrications, elastic system structure, membranes and plates, magnetically actuated systems, continuum theory and scaling laws. Microfluidics and nanofluidics devices.
Prereq.: Graduate standing.

ECEN 6990    Thesis    1-6 s.h.

.

ENGR 6900    Engineering Education Workshop    1-6 s.h.

Special topics related to engineering education. May be repeated. Grading is S/U. ,.

ENGR 6920    Project Planning and Management    3 s.h.

Methods for planning, organizing, scheduling, supporting, and controlling projects. Network techniques, including CPM, PERT, and time-cost trade-off analysis. Techniques for the estimation of time, manpower, and other resource requirements of the projects, including economic and statistical analysis, forecasting, learning curves, and line balancing. Management of time and other resources involved. Case studies and utilization of computer resources for the analysis and presentation of projects.
Prereq.: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ENGR 6921    Engineering Statistics    3 s.h.

Development and application of stochastic models of engineering systems. Elementary probability models applied to decision making under uncertainty. Development and use of theoretical probability distributions for describing stochastic systems. Models for point and confidence interval estimation and models for correlation analysis applied to engineering problems.

ENGR 6922    Engineering Systems Analysis    3 s.h.

Formulation and solutions of mathematical models in the engineering field. Analysis includes frequency and time response, boundary value problems, and state space variables.

ENGR 6923    Information Technology Tools For Engineers    3 s.h.

Accessing information through library databases, newsgraphs, WWW sites, etc. Using synchronous and asynchronous communication through web-based technologies. Information content creation, HTML client/server computing and their application in the engineering domain will be covered.

ENGR 6924    Computer Based Tools For Engineers    3 s.h.

Computer simulation of engineering models used in different engineering disciplines. The computer tools will include mathematical solvers and spreadsheets. Numerical solutions of linear and non-linear equations and ordinary and partial differential equations.
Prereq.: ENGR 6922.

ENGR 6925    Applied Environmental Management    3 s.h.

Practical application of environmental management practices in industry, with emphasis on regulatory compliance and international standards (ISO 14000). Areas of focus include monitoring of emission sources, air and water pollution control, solid and hazardous waste management, pollution prevention, employee health and safety, and property development and transfer.

ISEN 5801    Operations Research 1    3 s.h.

Formulation and solution of engineering problems using linear programming. Model formulation, the primal, dual, and transportation simplex methods, duality theory, and sensitivity analysis.
Prereq.: MATH 2673.

ISEN 5811L    Manufacturing Practices I Laboratory    1 s.h.

Experimental analysis of manufacturing processes. Process control and data acquisition. Experimental design applied to processes including polymer processes, casting, machining, and joining. Three hours laboratory.
Prereq. or concurrent ISEN 3723.

ISEN 5812L    Manufacturing Practices 2 Laboratory    1 s.h.

Experimental analysis of advanced manufacturing techniques. Advanced sensing and controlling technologies. Real-time monitoring, metrology, and data acquisition. Numerically controlled (NC) machines and programming. Net-shape and additive manufacturing.
Prereq. or concurrent ISEN 5823.

ISEN 5820    Advanced Quality for Engineers    3 s.h.

Applications and practices of quality control in industry. Engineering and administrative aspects of quality control programs, process control, and acceptance sampling. Application of quantitative methods to the design and evaluation of engineered products, processes, and systems.
Prereq.: ISEN 3720.

ISEN 5823    Automation    3 s.h.

Principles and applications of sensing, actuation and control. Emphasis on hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Industrial process controllers, sensors and machine vision. Design and cost considerations for industrial automation applications.
Prereq.: MECH 2641, ECEN 2614 or consent of instructor.

ISEN 5825    Advanced Engineering Economy    3 s.h.

An extension of the topics in engineering economy. Analysis of rationale and norm of decision making, risk and uncertainty models, utility theory, measurement of productivity, and advanced project comparison methods.
Prereq.: ISEN 3724.

ISEN 5830    Human Factors Engineering    3 s.h.

Various aspects of human factors in the design of human-machine systems and environments. Study of human sensory, perceptual, mental, psychomotor, and other characteristics; techniques of measuring human capabilities, limitations, safety, comfort, and productivity.
Prereq.: MATH 2673.

ISEN 5850    Operations Research 2    3 s.h.

Formulation and solution of industrial engineering problems using operational research models. Topics include queuing models and the specialization of linear models to equipment replacement, project planning, assignment, and transshipment problems.
Prereq.: ISEN 5801.

ISEN 5880    Management of Technology    3 s.h.

The course discusses major topics in management of technology and innovations. Dynamics of technology innovation, sources of technology innovations, corporate technology strategy, collaboration and intellectual property, structures and process for innovations, idea generation, commercialization of technology and innovations, and market entry.
Prereq.: Senior standing or consent of instructor.

ISEN 5881    Competitive Manufacturing Management    3 s.h.

Basic principles of manufacturing competitiveness. The role of engineers in promoting competitiveness. Discussion of new technologies used in modern manufacturing management including, continuous improvement, waste elimination, JIT, lean production systems, setup time reduction, equipment maintenance/improvement, total quality management, and supply chain management.
Prereq.: ISEN 3723 or consent of instructor.

ISEN 6901    Optimization Techniques    3 s.h.

A study of the theory of optimization and its application to problems from several engineering disciplines. The principles will be applied to constrained and unconstrained engineering problems. Algorithms will be developed for solving optimization problems, which can be formulated as linear, nonlinear, integer, or dynamic programming models.

ISEN 6902    Digital Simulation    3 s.h.

A study of simulation methods using digital computers, random number generation, Monte Carlo techniques, queuing models, and analysis of simulation output. The student will be provided the opportunity to simulate moderately complex systems on digital computers. Primary emphasis will be on models of technical, scientific, and economic systems.

ISEN 6905    Applied Statistics for Design, Quality, and Productivity    3 s.h.

Review of probability and statistics, uncertainty and decision making, statistical inference, and analyzing sources of variation. Risk and reliability, risk assessment, robust and quality design, regression analysis, and analysis of variance. Design of experiments, single-factor and multifactor experiments, design of experiments for product characteristics, process characteristics, and process optimization. General statistical process control, special charts and sampling techniques for control, monitoring, and auditing quality. Economic issues in process/quality control.
Prereq.: ISEN 3710 Engineering Statistics or equivalent.

ISEN 6906    Supply Chain Engineering    3 s.h.

In an expanding global economy, efficient and responsive supply chains are critical to business success. This course explores key aspects of supply chain engineering with an emphasis on mathematical approaches to supply chain analysis. Topics include demand forecasting, inventory modeling and control, facility location, capacity planning, transportation, warehousing, scheduling, material requirements planning and procurement.
Prereq.: ISEN 3710/ISEN 6921 and consent of instructor.

ISEN 6908    Logistics Engineering and Mgt    3 s.h.

Study of logistics from a systems engineering perspective. Covers design of systems for supportability and serviceability, the production and effective distribution of systems for customer use, and the sustaining maintenance and support of systems throughout their period of utilization.
Prereq.: ISEN 3720, ISEN 5801 or consent of the instructor.

ISEN 6910    Design and Analysis Experiment    3 s.h.

For professionals from business and industry, and students. Specific topics will be announced each time the workshop is offered. Credit hours based on frequency and duration of workshop meetings.

ISEN 6920    Project Management    3 s.h.

Methods for planning, organizing, scheduling, supporting, and controlling projects. Network techniques, including CPM, PERT, and time-cost trade-off analysis. Techniques for the estimation of time, manpower, and other resource requirements of the projects, including economic and statistical analysis, forecasting, learning curves, and line balancing. Management of time and other resources involved. Case studies and utilization of computer resources for the analysis and presentation of projects.
Prereq.: graduate standing in STEM college.

ISEN 6921    Engineering Statistics    3 s.h.

Development and application of stochastic models of engineering systems. Elementary probability models applied to decision making under uncertainty. Development and use of theoretical probability distributions for describing stochastic systems. Models for point and confidence interval estimation and models for correlation analysis applied to engineering problems.
Prereq.: ISEN 3710 or equivalent.

ISEN 6930    Microcomputer Models for Deterministic Engineering Systems    3 s.h.

Microcomputer model development, implementation, evaluation, and application for deterministic engineering systems. Recognition of engineering systems amenable to analysis as deterministic microcomputer models. Determination of model structure, identification of model parameters, verification of model validity, exercising the model, and interpretation of results.

ISEN 6935    Decision Analysis for Engineering    3 s.h.

Review of probability and statistics, subjective probability, probability models, using data, Monte Carlo simulation, and value of information. Introduction to decision analysis, elements of decision problems, structuring decisions, making choices, creativity, and decision making. Risk attitudes, utility axioms, paradoxes, and conflicting objectives.
Prereq.: ISEN 3710 Engineering Statistics or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

ISEN 6970    Advanced Manufacturing Processes 1    3 s.h.

Advanced manufacturing processes for metallic materials. Included are continuous casting, powder techniques, fluidized bed reactors, and directional solidification.

ISEN 6971    Advanced Manufacturing Processes 2    3 s.h.

Advanced manufacturing processes for nonmetallic materials. Included are sintering, slip casting, plastic forming techniques, and extrusion of nonplastic materials.

ISEN 6990    Special Topics    3 s.h.

Special topics in industrial/manufacturing systems engineering covering areas not otherwise available. Topics are selected by the faculty from fields of current research interest or special emphasis and may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours.

ISEN 6992    Graduate Projects    3 s.h.

Analysis, design, research, or other independent investigation on projects selected with the advice and approval of the student's graduate committee.
Prereq.: Permission of instructor.

ISEN 6999    Thesis    1-6 s.h.

Hours arranged. May be repeated.

MECH 5811    Solar Engineering    3 s.h.

Radiational characteristics of solar energy, glass materials and selective coatings. Analysis of flat plate collectors, concentrators, and thermal storage. System simulation and economic analysis for optimization of basic solar systems.
Prereq.: PHYS 2611, MECH 3725 or consent of chairperson.

MECH 5825    Heat Transfer 2    3 s.h.

Advanced topics in heat transfer. Multi-dimensional conduction, free convection, phase change heat transfer and thermal radiation. Integration of analytical, numerical, and computational methods into design projects.
Prereq.: MECH 3708 and MECH 3725.

MECH 5836    Fluid Power and Control    3 s.h.

Theory of prime movers, turbomachinery, and control systems. Modeling of hydraulic and pneumatic systems and components. Hydraulic fluids, pumps, cylinders, valves, motors, compressors, and actuators. Hydraulic and pneumatic circuit applications and control.
Prereq.: MECH 3725.

MECH 5842    Kinetics of Machines    3 s.h.

Three dimensional kinematics and dynamics of machines. Dynamic analysis and design; balancing of machines.
Prereq.: MECH 3742.

MECH 5852    Stress and Strain Analysis 2    3 s.h.

Continuation of MECH 3751. Introduction to applied elasticity theory including plane stress and strain and stress functions. Plastic and creep behavior of materials. Introduction to instability. Emphasis on design applications.
Prereq.: MECH 3751, MECH 3751L, MATH 3705.

MECH 5872    Engineering Acoustics    3 s.h.

The nature of sound and its propagation; analysis and control of sound and noise production in mechanical equipment; transmission and absorption of sound in engineering materials, ultrasonics, structural acoustics, base measurements, and equipment.
Prereq.: MECH 3708.

MECH 5881    Mechanical Vibrations    3 s.h.

Introduction to mechanical vibrations: single and multi-degree of freedom systems, free and forced vibrations, impedance and modal analysis including applications.
Prereq.: MECH 3708.

MECH 5881L    Mechanical Vibrations Laboratory    1 s.h.

Introduction to vibrations measurements. Experiments with mechanical systems, computer simulation of vibration systems. Experimental determination of component models and parameters. Three hours laboratory per week.
Prereq.: MECH 5881.

MECH 5884    Finite Element Analysis    3 s.h.

Fundamental principles of finite element analysis with emphasis on applications to design in areas of stress analysis, vibrations, and heat transfer. Use of commercial software.
Prereq.: MECH 3708, MECH 3725, MECH 3751.

MECH 5885    Computational Fluid Dynamics    3 s.h.

Applied numerical analysis, including solution of linear algebraic equations and ordinary and partial differential equations; modeling of physical processes, including fluid flow and heat and mass transfer; use of general purpose computer codes, including commercial computational fluid dynamics software packages.
Prereq.: MECH 3720 and MECH 3725.

MECH 5892    Control of Mechanical Systems    3 s.h.

Introduction to theory of feedback and control. Performance and stability of linear systems. Design of feedback control systems. Practical application and introduction to state-space methods. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.
Prereq.: MECH 3708.

MECH 6900    Special Topics    2-4 s.h.

Special topics and new developments in mechanical engineering. Subject matter and credit hours to be announced in advance of each offering. May be taken three times.
Prereq.: As announced or permission of instructor.

MECH 6904    Advanced Thermodynamics    3 s.h.

Laws of equilibrium thermodynamics; relations between properties and aspects of the Second Law. Exergy analysis. Macroscopic and microscopic considerations for the prediction of properties. Microscopic description based on classical and quantum statistics. General stability criteria, statistical equilibrium, and trend toward equilibrium fluctuations.
Prereq.: Permission of graduate advisor.

MECH 6915    Failure Analysis    3 s.h.

Advanced methods in failure analysis of metallics, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Numerous practical examples will be discussed. Individual student projects using scanning electron microscopy are required. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

MECH 6925    Computational Heat Transfer    3 s.h.

Numerical modeling techniques and methods in heat transfer. Computational analysis of conduction and convection by the finite element method, finite difference method, and the method of coordinate transformation.
Prereq.: MATH 3705 Differential Equations and MECH 3725 Heat Transfer I, or permission of instructor.

MECH 6930    Advanced Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer    3 s.h.

Viscous and inviscid flows, Navier-Stokes equations, Euler equations, and complex variables methods. Analytic solutions to advanced heat transfer problems, advanced boundary-value problems.
Prereq.: MECH 3725 Heat Transfer I or equivalent.

MECH 6945    Advanced Dynamics    3 s.h.

Three-dimensional vector statics; kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies; energy, momentum, and stability. LaGrange's equations of motion for particles and rigid bodies impulse; small oscillations; nonholonomic and dissipative systems.
Prereq.: Permission of graduate advisor.

MECH 6952    Applied Elasticity    3 s.h.

Equations or equilibrium, compatibility and boundary conditions-their applications to plane stress and plane strain problems. Stress functions, strain energy methods, stress distribution in anile symmetrical bodies; special problems in structures involving torsion and bending of prismatical bars.
Prereq.: MECH 3751 Stress and Strain Analysis I or equivalent, or permission of graduate advisor.

MECH 6962    Mechanical Design Analysis    3 s.h.

The study of analytical aspects and the application of engineering science topics to machine elements and machinery. Some case studies in mechanical design.
Prereq.: Permission of graduate advisor.

MECH 6963    Advanced Stress Analysis    3 s.h.

Theory and engineering applications of the most recent techniques of experimental stress analysis, brittle coatings, photoelasticity, strain gauges, photostress.
Prereq.: MECH 3751 Stress and Strain Analysis I or equivalent or permission of graduate advisor.

MECH 6983    Modern Power Sources    3 s.h.

Analytical and descriptive study of modern power plants. Combustion and environmental problems with fossil-fueled power plants. Electromagnetic circuits and devices with emphasis on the principles of electromechanical energy conversions. Cross-listed as CHEN 6983 and ECEN 6983.
Prereq.: Permission of graduate advisor.

MECH 6985    Electromechanical Motion Devices    3 s.h.

Thermodynamics of batteries, and electric and fuel cells. Power from nuclear isotopes. Features common to rotating electromagnetic fields. Analysis and design of electromechanical power components. Logical circuit design with I/O structure and interface. Cross-listed as CHEN 6985 and ECEN 6985.

MECH 6990    Thesis    2-6 s.h.

.

MECH 6991    Thesis    2-6 s.h.

.

MECH 6992    Graduate Projects    3 s.h.

Analysis, design, research, or other independent investigation on projects selected with the advice and approval of the student's graduate committee.

MTEN 5868    Failure Analysis Using the SEM    3 s.h.

Advanced methods in failure analysis of products and structures. Failure modes and mechanisms. Characteristics of fracture surfaces. Failure analysis investigations using the stereomicroscope and the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Two hours lecture, three hours lab per week.
Prereq.: 96 s.h. of degree credit and permission of instructor.